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17 Mar 2014

031814

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Front Squat – 6×2 (work up to a challenging double and complete a total of 6 sets at that weight)

–Dips perform sets of 3-5 reps (AHAP) between each set of front squat

notes:
Be sure to give yourself adequate rest after the dips before your next set of front squat.

16 Mar 2014

031714

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TEST Day

1. Max Pull ups
2. Max Push ups
3. 1:00 Sit ups
4. Tabata Squats

Skill: Grease the muscle up groove

Reebok CrossFit Games Open 14.3

Alright! Many of you have already completed this WOD. Let me start off this tip with the following: UNLESS YOU ARE CLOSE TO QUALIFYING FOR REGIONALS AND YOU ROYALLY MESSED UP THE APPLICATION OF YOUR STRATEGY, DO NOT REPEAT THIS WOD. There is great potential to really injury yourself. The low back is going to be sore and fatigued even if you were able to maintain midline stabilization for every single rep. My glutes and hamstrings are ridiculously on fire today, this is a good thing, but it would mean that they would not be ready to attack this WOD again soon and it would push the stress to the back.

If you have not yet completed the WOD, here are some quick tips:

1. Don’t go out too fast. Find a good rhythm that allows you to go from bar to box and box to bar with no rest. The rest is built in with you loading the plates as the load increases.

2. If you need to drop to fast singles b/c the weight is too heavy to link touch and go reps, then you need to stay right over your bar take one quick breath and get back into position and lift.

3. As you are warming up, determine which provides greater economy: step ups or box jumps. I am a believer that step ups are going to allow a faster/more consistent pace for the LONG TERM of this WOD. There are some exceptions like Dave Young. A 24″ box jump is a large step up for him and he is a good box jumper.

4. BRACE, BRACE, BRACE – If you cannot do this well, your back will not like you for the rest of the weekend.

That’s it! Good luck and push onward!

PROGRAMMING

Saturday 3/15

1. Recovery WOD complete for time
Run 1 mile
5 rounds of:
20 Push ups
20 OH Walking Lunges, 45/25
Run 1 mile

rest 10-20 minutes (mobilize)

2. Back Squat – 6×2 (work up to a challenging 2 and then hold for a total of 6 sets)

Sunday 3/16

1. AMRAP 4
5 STO, 115/75
5 Knee to elbows

8 minutes

AMRAP 4
5 Thruster, 95/65
5 Burpees

rest 8 minutes

AMRAP 4
5 STO, 115/75
5 KTE’s

rest 8 minutes

AMRAP 4
5 Thruster, 95/65
5 Burpees

Monday 3/17 (WEAR GREEN)

TEST Day

1. Max Pull ups
2. Max Push ups
3. 1:00 Sit ups
4. Tabata Squats

Skill: Grease the muscle up groove

Tuesday 3/18

1. Front Squat – 6×2 (work up to a challenging double and complete a total of 6 sets at that weight)

–Dips perform sets of 3-5 reps (AHAP) between each set of front squat

notes:
Be sure to give yourself adequate rest after the dips before your next set of front squat.

Wednesday 3/19

1. Row 500m (max effort)
rest the amount of time it took to complete 500m
2. Row 1000m (max effort)
rest the amount of time it took to complete 1000m
3. Row 1500m (max effort)
rest the amount of time it took to complete 1500m
4. Run 1500m (max effort)

Skill: Grease the muscle up groove

Thursday 3/20

1. EMOM 10 – Snatch 1-2 reps (work up to AHAP)

2. AMRAP 12
5 DB Shoulder Press, 40/20
10 AbMat sit ups
15 Double unders

14 Mar 2014

031514

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1. Recovery WOD complete for time
Run 1 mile
5 rounds of:
20 Push ups
20 OH Walking Lunges, 45/25
Run 1 mile

rest 10-20 minutes (mobilize)

2. Back Squat – 6×2 (work up to a challenging 2 and then hold for a total of 6 sets)

Hey Mickey!

Welcome to the TEAM Mickey!

Welcome to the TEAM Mickey!

I want to officially welcome longtime member Mickey Grouse to the TEAM! Mickey has been training with us for over 4 years, has competed in some local and regional events, volunteered his talents as a DJ for parties, etc. Now he will be apprenticing to be apart of our Coaching TEAM. 

Mickey is an all around good dude and cares a ton about the CrossFit Boston Community. He received his CrossFit L1 Certificate back in 2011. You will see him primarily shadowing me in both group classes and private sessions. He will soon be leading portions of the class and ultimately entire classes.

Give him a big fist bump and a FIRE IT UP!!

CrossFit Games 14.3

CrossFit Games Open 14.3 (AMRAP – Reps)
8-Minute AMRAP:
10 Deadlifts, 135# / 95#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
15 Deadlifts, 185# / 135#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
20 Deadlifts, 225# / 155#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
25 Deadlifts, 275# / 185#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
30 Deadlifts, 315# / 205#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
35 Deadlifts, 365# / 225#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″

Deadlift and box jumps! Alright, we finally have a little weight now in the open. The ascending volume AND weight for the deadlift will make it challenging to maintain midline stabilization and not blow out the low back. Everyone will need to focus on bracing really tight while pushing the ground away through the heels rather than pulling the bar off the floor. Establish a pace that will be just below your threshold and allow you to keep moving steady. This is very similar to the pacing needs of Wednesday’s Row/Thruster WOD.

If 225 is heavy, be prepared to start breaking up into sets of 5 so that you can move faster. Try to avoid singles until you absolutely have to. If you are lucky enough to get into the heavier weights you need to game plan the number of reps/sets for completion. Think similarly to last week’s CTB pull ups, except you will have a much higher muscle economy.

Step ups or box jumps are permitted with the requirement of both feet on the floor at full standing and both feet on the box at full standing. The kicker is the height of the box. For the men, if you are shorter, a 24″ box may be too much to expect a good pace with step ups. Ladies you should be fine with 20″. We have been training the Games Standard for box jumps the last couple of weeks so you should know how to pace this already. 15 reps is manageable, just be sure to breathe and maintain control of your body.

Good Luck to everyone today!

What’s On Tap!

Keep your eyes open for another post today with next week’s programming!

14 Mar 2014

031414 – CF GAMES 14.3

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CrossFit Games Open 14.3 (AMRAP – Reps)

8-Minute AMRAP:
10 Deadlifts, 135# / 95#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
15 Deadlifts, 185# / 135#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
20 Deadlifts, 225# / 155#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
25 Deadlifts, 275# / 185#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
30 Deadlifts, 315# / 205#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
35 Deadlifts, 365# / 225#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″

Kevin P. on Wall Balls for FGB!

Kevin P. on Wall Balls for FGB!

I don’t know about you guys, but my shoulders have been feeling it this week after attacking “14.2″.  Congrats to everyone that gave it a go.  I saw many retests and PR’s earlier this week and it was a blast seeing everyone break through their previous scores.  I hope you’ve taken some extra time to smash and mobilize as we get ready for “14.3″.

 

If you’re looking for some extra tips on mobilizing those shoulders consider signing up for our Partner Mobility Seminar on Saturday, March 29th!

 

Sign Up for the Partner Mobility Seminar Here!

 

It will also be a good opportunity to get to know some of our new members.  Here are pictures of a few members that crushed “Fight Gone Bad” and graduated to group classes over the past week.  Give them a shout if you see them in class!

 

Have a great weekend and get after “14.3″!

 

John W. post FGB!

John W. post FGB!

Who are you and what are you about?

 

My name is John Woodson and I am from Lawton, Oklahoma. I did my undergraduate degree at the University of Oklahoma and love my Oklahoma Sooners and OKC Thunder. I am a pretty big sports fan and I grew up playing baseball and basketball. I moved to Boston in 2012 for grad school and have accepted a job up here once I finish up in May.  I have been married to my wife, Whitney, for 3 years this May and we are both super excited to be staying up here in Boston.

 

Why did you join CrossFit Boston?

 

Like I said earlier, I grew up playing team sports and was always used to working out with my team.  But when I went to college and my sports career tapered off, I couldn’t seem to get into a good individual routine.  I would always try to start some new workout regimen, but after 2 weeks would just get bored doing the same things all the time by myself.  I lived in Houston before coming to Boston, and one of my buddies down there started describing crossfit to me and it sounded like just the thing I needed. But I didn’t take any actions about it.  When I moved up to Boston I focused on grad school for a year, but earlier this January looked in the mirror and realized I was about 30 pounds overweight and needed to do something before it got too late. So I called Crossfit Boston and started the 10 session training program.

 

What are you getting out of the Private Training?

 

A ton.  The private training helps on so many levels. After 8 years without consistent exercise, I struggle through a lot of what we do and have to scale several of the exercises.  But having Pat there as my instructor helps me make sure I’m keeping proper form to avoid injury, and he acts as a great coach and motivator. I am able to do more in these sessions than I would have imagined, and I keep improving all the time.

 

Mike H. on SDHP for FGB!

Mike H. on SDHP for FGB!

What are some of your goals for this year?

 

When I started a month ago, I weighed in at 214 pounds and was close to 30% body fat. I now weigh in at 204 and am closer to 26% body fat.  I am hoping to get down below 20% and closer to 15% at least by the end of this year.

 

I used to be able to do 10 pullups no problem back in high school.  I can’t do a single one now.  Eventually, I would like to be able to hit 10 again.

 

Overall I just want to feel better.  My weight and fitness issues have been an emotional as well as physical drain on me.  I want be able to play basketball without needing to take breaks every 5 minutes on the floor. I want to be able to go out and enjoy a nice run in this beautiful city I now call home. Most of all, I want to make habits and build skills that will set me up to stay fit for the rest of my life.

 

What are you looking forward to once you graduate to group classes?

 

Working out with a group again.  Having people there so we can all push and encourage each other and getting to know more people at the gym.

 

Just seeing continued progress on top of the foundation I am building through the private trainings.

12 Mar 2014

031314

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1. 30 Unbroken Wallball shots

2. AMRAP 4
10 Burpees
10 DB squat cleans, 40/20

If 60 reps (3 rounds) are completed in under 4 minutes, time extends to 8 minutes.
If 120 reps (6 rounds) are completed in under 8 minutes, time extends to 12 minutes.
If 180 reps (9 rounds) are completed in under 12 minutes, time extends to 16 minutes.

12 Mar 2014

Paleo Pro’s and Cons

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Sorry for the late blog post! I’ve seen lots of new faces in the gym over the past few months, so I am reposting my go-to article on the good and bad aspects of the paleo diet, and some recommendations for using it to improve your diet for anyone who’s heard of the paleo diet during their intro sessions but still wants more information (or for anyone who wants a refresher). Also, I’m a little short on time as I’m in California for work (you feel so sorry for me, right?).

 

The Paleo diet -  also known as the “caveman diet” – is a way of eating inspired by the diet of our Paleolithic ancestors, the men and women who lived 2.5 million years ago, before the agricultural revolution began about 10,000 years ago and provided mankind with a steady supply of grains, corn, dairy, and domestic meat. The theory behind Paleo eating is that our bodies are genetically programmed to eat certain foods, and that many modern health problems like obesity result from the introduction of grains, dairy, and other processed foods, which wreak havoc on our metabolic systems. The diet, and it’s “allowed” and “restricted” foods, are based on anthropological research providing insight into what pre-agricultural humans ate.

 

Foods allowed on a strict Paleolithic diet include lean meats and seafood, eggs, fruits and non-starchy vegetables, nuts (except peanuts), seeds, and plant-based oils such as olive, coconut, avocado, walnut, or grapeseed. Restricted foods include processed meats (like salami), dairy, grains such as rice, pasta, wheat, and corn, starchy vegetables like potatoes, soy products, legumes like beans and peanuts, alcohol, and refined sugar.  Following a Paleo diet does not require minding of portion sizes or food measurement. The recommendation is to eat Paleo approved foods when you are hungry and stop when you are full. The idea is that it’s fairly hard to eat too many calories when they are coming from protein sources and high fiber, filling sides like vegetables, fruits, or healthy fats. The Paleo diet can be followed strictly or modified to meet your individual needs. For instance, some follow an “80/20” rule, eating Paleo about 80% of the time and allowing room for leniency with other foods or cheat days. Others follow a strict Paleo diet but include dairy, butter, or both.

 

 

The Research on the Paleo diet, while promising, is fairly limited. Several small studies have shown a Paleolithic diet may help improve markers of health in both healthy people and those with chronic disease. For example, one study showed that a Paleolithic diet resulted in lower mean glycated hemoglobin (a measure of blood sugar control over time) values, diastolic blood pressure, and waist circumference, and higher HDL cholesterol (the “good” cholesterol) when compared to a standard diabetes diet. Among healthy adults, a small metabolically controlled study (meaning what participants ate was strictly controlled) found improvements in blood pressure, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and cholesterol without weight loss over a 10-day period.

 

In addition, while the evidence for the Paleo diet specifically, especially in athletes, is not prolific, research has shown high-protein, low-carbohydrate type diets to be effective for fat loss in a number of studies. Recently, a study appearing in Nutrition & Metabolismfound that Paleo dieters not only felt more satisfied in terms of appetite, but also had lower levels of circulating leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite, food consumption, and body fat storage.

 

Why Eating Paleo is Awesome…

 

  • It eliminates the crap – eating whole foods and avoiding food products with refined sugars, preservatives, harmful additives, high levels of sodium, and added fats has numerous benefits in terms of weight management, health, and athletic performance.
  • More vitamins and minerals – because you eat more fruits and veggies on a Paleo diet, you are getting much more fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants than on a typical Western Diet. Vitamins can help, but 90% of the nutrients in a typical multivitamin tablet are not absorbed but are excreted (meaning you pee them out). Studies have shown that eating more fruits and vegetables reduces cancer risk, but when researchers attempted to isolate and supplement specific vitamins common in produce, the effect wasn’t replicated.
  • Less “bad” fat and more “good” fat – the Paleo diet typically consists of more omega-3 and unsaturated fats via increased intake of foods like almonds, walnuts, and avocados and reduction in saturated fats by eliminating high fat meats and processed foods like chips and desserts. Unsaturated fats may reduce inflammation, which is good for everyone, especially athletes.
  • Health Benefits – although the research is limited, the Paleo diet has been associated with greater weight loss success, greater satiety, and improvements in markers of chronic disease. There are numerous anecdotes of people having found success eating this way.

 

Why it’s not so awesome...

 

  • It takes more planning – it’s easy to get enough carbohydrates and calcium on a standard American diet. It’s also easy to grab lunch at the office if you forgot to pack it. So while it’s possible to meet all your nutritional needs on a Paleo diet while enjoying good food, it requires more planning and, often times, ahead of time meal preparation. If you’re not used to packing your lunch or cooking nearly all of your meals, it will take an adjustment.
  • $$$ – I don’t subscribe to the belief that it is more expensive to eat a healthy diet, but following a strict Paleo diet will up your grocery bill, at least a little bit, due to increased purchasing of meat and vegetables. This increase will be greater if you switch completely to organic and grass-fed products. On the flip side, if you give up junk food and soda and eat out less, this will probably even out.
  • Does it make sense? – Dr. Cordain argues that our bodies are genetically adapted to a Paleo diet, and the influence of grains and processed foods has led to our current health problems. But people started eating bread 10,000 years ago, and the epidemic of obesity and chronic disease is at best a 30 year old problem. So is bread and dairy the devil? Or is an increasingly sedentary lifestyle combined with more people eating out more often and ever growing portion sizes the real culprit?
  • Carbohydrates – for most people the moderate carbohydrate levels in a Paleo diet are enough to support normal functioning and maintain glucose and glycogen stores. However, people with higher carbohydrate needs, like endurance athletes, or rowers doing multiple workouts per day, may have a hard time meeting them on a Paleo diet.The Paleo Diet for Athletes, written by Dr. Cordain and endurance coach Joe Friel, actually recommends following a Paleo diet for most of the time while supplementing other foods, such as sports drinks, around workouts to get adequate carbohydrates.
  • Difficulty – A US News Report rated the Paleo diet one of the worst diets for 2011 and difficulty was a factor. For some people, eliminating 3 major food categories (grains, dairy, legumes) may just be too much to stick with over an extended period. Going on a drastic diet that you won’t be able to maintain could result in frustration, stress, and ultimately giving up and just “eating whatever” for a while, which will be a weight loss and/or goal setback and just leads to more stress.

 

So what should you do?

 

As far as I’m concerned, there is no “perfect diet” for all people. That being said, I think there is merit to the principles behind the Paleo diet and at the very least I would consider it a good framework for building a healthy, maintainable diet. Ideally, you do want to eliminate processed foods (like Spam, Cheetos, fast food, etc) and focus on more “Paleo foods” like meat, vegetables, fruit, nuts, seeds, and oils. However having the occasional whole grain (that’s wheat bread, brown rice, whole wheat pasta, oatmeal etc), dairy product, or legume isn’t going to kill you (unless you have a food allergy).

 

Here are some good guidelines to follow:

  • Load up on lean meats, veggies, and fruits first. They contain those essential nutrients like protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.
  • Eat a healthy diet that works for you and doesn’t drive you nuts. You want to follow a healthful nutrition plan, but you don’t want to set yourself up for failure either.
  • Avoid processed crap. It’s that simple. If the ingredients list is longer than your entire grocery list and you find yourself trying to decide if it’s healthy, just put it back on the shelf. It’s probably not that great for you.
  • Avoid added sugars and sodium. That includes canned stuff, “pre-made” meals, sugary beverages, junk snacks, and many breakfast cereals.
  • Limit the booze. It’s empty calories and makes you feel not awesome the next day, which can increase cravings for less healthy foods and limit your desire and/or ability to work out.
  • Disregard all of the above and have a cheat day every now and then. It can be good for you. Check out why here.
Evan Michael Coniglio liked this post
11 Mar 2014

031214

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1. Shoulder Press – 7×2

2. EMOM 10
8 Chest to Bar Pull ups

notes:
1. work up to a challenging weight and then hold for 6 more sets

2. Scale by reducing volume first before reverting to chin over the bar. If athlete cannot perform CTB they perform chin over the bar