Are Sit Ups Bad For Your Back?

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Are Sit Ups Bad For Your Back?

Are Sit Ups Bad For Your Back?

The video above is from a leader in backs and biomechanics, Dr. Stuart M. McGill.  I first read about Dr. McGill’s work a few years ago and was awakened to it again last month at a movement seminar called The Movement Fix.  Are sit-ups or any movement that put’s your lower back through repeated repetitions of extension and flexion really necessary?

Are Sit Ups Bad For Your Back?

Yes, Sit Ups are bad for your back.  What?  Yes, think of your back, especially your lumbar spine (low back), as a credit card.  You can only bend that credit card forward and backward so many times before eventually it snaps.  Sit Ups put excessive compressive loading on your spinal discs and can easily lead to disc bulge and disc herniation.

Rowers with no posture or core support end up bending from their lower back rather than pivoting from the hips, which leads to all the horror stories of slipped discs in rowing.  This also shows up during any movement that involves a deadlift when athletes aren’t focused on maintaining good posture.  In rowing, different coaches may or may not have you reach from the thoracic spine, but a common theme that any coach will agree with is keeping the lumbar region stiff, supported, and protected.  The muscles that surround and support the spine are made to brace and resist motion, not create it.

Core Stability!

Without core stability it is impossible to transfer the force from your legs to the oar/barbell and move the boat/load at any type of speed.  This idea of core stability and the ability to connect your feet to your hands through the core is a skill needed in life and fitness as well.  There is no way to do an Olympic Lift like the Clean without having a solid core to work from.

After reflecting on this topic for a couple of years, I’ve decided to eliminate sit ups and other similar movements from my training.  Sure I will compete and perform sit ups, but I don’t need them to train day in and day out.  I like my back to much. Instead I’ve been playing around with paleo crawls, planks, bird dogs, and curl ups on a regular basis.

If you’d like to chat about this topic or would like to know what I’ve been doing for core stability let me know.  I hope this sparks some thought and further questions.  Have an awesome end of the week CFB

 

 

 

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