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It’s been getting super hot and sweaty in the gym this past month, so it seems like a good time to chat about hydration. I’ve posted on it before, and obviously the large portion of this blog post is a repost of this one on sports drinks. But, given how often I get asked “is the snatch a power snatch?” it seems like a reminder on hydration and sports drinks can only help :)

The Short Of It

Basically, don’t show up to a summer WOD (or any WOD, really) really really thirsty. Drinking a 17 oz bottle of water in the 1-2 hours leading up to the WOD is usually sufficient to prevent this. Obviously if you show up in the morning, a cup of water before you leave the house is fine. To replace fluid lost, the rule is 24 ounces for every pound of sweat lost. Don’t feel like weighing yourself? Drink another 17 ounce bottle, or as much of it as you can until you don’t feel thirsty anymore.

Quick Thoughts on Sports Drinks?

They have a purpose, but are highly overused. No, your kid doesn’t need a Gatorade after playing 45 total minutes of soccer. Stick to the orange slices. Who needs them? College football players. Lebron James. Marathoners. Unless you’re a really salty sweater, you don’t need one before/during/after the average WOD. Maybe after Murph or Glen, not after Fran. You may find a benefit during a long Oly because of the sugar, but most people will do fine just drinking water.

The Long Answer on Sports Drinks: REPOST from June 2014

If you played sports as a kid, you probably grew up on the delicious, refreshing beverage called Gatorade (or Powerade, although I think Gatorade is better). Originally invented at the University of Florida (Go Gators) to hydrate the football team during hot summer games, Gatorade now produces a regular and low calorie drink, “natural” versions of these beverages, as well as energy chews and nutrition bars. And their marketing has been stellar – watch any Gatorade ad and you’re pretty much convinced that you should drink this stuff because that’s what the badass athletes do (and who doesn’t want to be a badass athlete). They’re all about that inspiring stuff like hard work and determination. Well, at least most kids probably think that. As adults, we’re just trained to crave it. If I go running in sub 75 degree weather for longer than 30 minutes, I come back craving a blue Gatorade (because maybe the flavor is inspired by some fruit, but we just know it by the color. Yellow is a close second for me). Of course, Gatorade has also gotten some negative press surrounding their use of brominated vegetable oil (BVO) – which they’ve since discontinued using – because it had been patented as a flame retardant and is banned in Japan and the European Union.  But, is it OK to drink or should you avoid it?

Sports Drink Pros

Sports drinks are great – and have been successful over the past 40 years – because they provide the unique combination of dilute carbohydrate and electrolytes in an easily digestible format. Sports drinks have essentially been formulated by scientists to provide EXACTLY what athletes need during exercise to prevent dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The average regular Gatorade has 80 calories, 21 grams of sugar, 160 mg of sodium, and 45 mg of potassium. The G2 series is usually 30 calories and 7 grams of carbohydrate with the same electrolyte content as the original.

Other Gatorade perks:

  • Helps prevent hyponatremia (salt deficiency), which generally happens when athletes over hydrate.
  • The taste generally makes you thirsty, so you drink more. When you’re working out for a long time (over an hour) in very hot conditions, that can be a plus.
  • It tastes good. Sometimes water gets old.

Gatorade Cons

Despite loving Gatorade as a kid/teen just kidding I still love it now, this is the part that always makes me sad: the ingredients list. The Blue G2 flavor (apparently called “Glacier Freeze) that I like so much contains the following: Water (fine), sugar (OK I was expecting that), citric acid (not a big deal), sodium citrate (OK that’s the sodium, just with a different companion than table salt), mono potassium phosphate (potassium source), sucralose (commonly known as Splenda), acesulfame potassium (anOTHER artificial sweetener) and Blue 1 (artificial coloring). So, most of the ingredients are fine, not everything that isn’t 100% natural is going to kill you, although I really try to avoid artificial colors.

In addition, a few other sports drink drawbacks:

  • It often gets misused or overused. Pretty sure Lebron James needed some Gatorade in San Antonio when the AC broke, and it’s very useful during a half marathon or other endurance activity. But a lot of kids, adolescents, and even adults nowadays are drinking it while playing video games or at school. Unless you’re sweating your butt off during a workout, you don’t really need an electrolyte drink.
  • The taste generally makes you thirsty, so you drink more. Yes, I realize this was also a pro. But when I return from a 45 minute run, I could benefit from 8-12 ounces and end up drinking nearly the whole bottle before it occurs to me to put it away. That’s a lot of sugar I probably didn’t need.

So, should you drink Gatorade?

My answer is yes, when it is appropriate and if you prefer it over other options. When is it appropriate?

  • When you’re working out for over 60-90 minutes or in extreme heat conditions
  • When you complete a WOD like last week’s 1K test on the erg and need a little extra sugar before the second WOD. However, in this case you only need a small amount.

What are some other options? Coconut water, diluted juice (full concentrated juice can make you fee sick to your stomach by adding too much sugar – compare 21 grams of carbs in 12 ounces of Gatorade to over 40 grams in the same amount of Naked Juice or OJ).

UPDATE: The Oly lifters have begun using boba tea as an alternative fuel during their lifts. Great idea (as long as you avoid the stuff with lots of milk/non diary creamer. Milk in heat is a bad choice. See: Anchorman), and now I have them to thank for the boba tea kick I’m on.

I never thought of myself as super green (I just can’t bring myself to do the water efficient shower head things), but the amount of zip loc bags Pat and I went through and the decline of our tupperware collection was really bothering me. I wanted to throw it all away and buy new tupperware but then I would just be using MORE PLASTIC.  Then a friend sent us home from a weekend with leftovers in a mason jar and my whole lunch packing system was changed. Since it’s summer, this happens to mean salads packed in mason jars. Which, I must say, is not a new concept, and is by no means my own invention. Google “Mason Jar Salad” and you’ll have pages of recipes. In this post, I’ll cover a basic template for crafting a salad, as well as 2 of my favorite recipes.

The Template

The basic mason jar salad is stacked so that everything stays fresh and flavorful, because no one likes mushy salad.

The bottom layer is usually your protein – beans, quinoa, chicken, etc.

Next comes your nuts/seeds layer, should you have one. I like adding sliced almonds or sunflower seeds.

Top the protein and nut/seed layer with cheese if you add it – goat cheese is my recent staple of choice, and I usually use about 2 TB.

Next add any other vegetables – carrots, peppers, squash, cucumber, etc.

Finally, top with salad. I usually pack it in there as much as I can and wind up with a little too much lettuce. So pack it tight, but not sardine can tight.

Today’s Mason Jar Salad

The picture above is my dinner for the rest of the week. Each mason jar contains:

2 TB Walnuts

1/4 cup cooked farro (I actually used a little more – like 5 TB)

2 TB goat cheese

1/2 cup strawberries

Spring mix to fill

I tend to use a fig balsamic vinaigrette from Whole Foods on top, although since this has fruit already I may just use oil and vinegar, or use no dressing at all. I tend to dress the salad after I’ve emptied the jar. To prep, I bought a large container of spring mix, a large container of strawberries, and the goat cheese, and cooked 1 cup of dry farro. This should last me at least four days.

An Old Favorite

A couple of weeks ago I was on a huge kick with this salad. In each jar I had:

2 TB sunflower seeds

1/4 cup farro

2 TB goat cheese

1/2 cup acorn squash, cooked and cut in squares

Spring mix to fill

1 TB fig balsamic dressing (Whole Foods brand)

The Pitch

If you couldn’t tell, I’m a huge fan of these salads. It’s an easy way to transport lunch, it’s sustainable (no throwing away 3 zip locs per assembled salad), and they’re easy to play around with. Prep is also pretty easy – just cook the farro and cut up the vegetables. You can quickly build your salad in the morning or all at once on Sunday.

Got a favorite recipe to share?

 

 

09 Jun 2015

Small Changes, Big Results

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I was talking to someone this weekend, who wanted to lose a few pounds but still wanted to “eat how I usually eat”. Basically, he wanted to see results but didn’t have the time or energy to totally revamp his diet. Given that this person has a full time job and goes to graduate school at night, that’s understandable. What I want this person – and you all – to realize is that you don’t have to totally overhaul your diet to see some results.

There is a lot that goes into “how” or “what” you eat. A few factors:

  • WHERE – do you eat most of your meals at home (or pack lunch from home), or do you often eat out?
  • WHEN – how often do you eat? For example do you eat 3 squares or 5 small meals?
  • WHO – do you often eat at your desk alone or with coworkers? With a spouse at the dinner table or whenever you happen to be hungry?
  • WHY – hunger? Boredom? Social construct (birthday cake is a great example of this)?

As I was talking to this person, I realized a few things.

  • They’re busy, and didn’t want to add a lot of extra work to their schedule in the pursuit of healthy diet
  • They liked being able to eat out with coworkers instead of sad desk lunch
  • They WERE open to changing some aspects of their diet within these constructs

What this boils down to then, isn’t a diet overhaul. It’s tweaking. And while to have a perfectly sculpted body a la David Beckham or Yelena Isanbayeva (Go ahead and Google her – and consider this my small part to educate the world on non-traditional Olympic sports) you DO need a complete diet overhaul – and probably an overhaul of your workout regimen too – you do not need this to drop a few pounds.

To use my friend as an example, I asked what he ate on a normal day. It was as follows:

Morning: Workout early, eat a banana and large coffee with two sugars (Dunkies of course).

Lunch: Lunch out with coworkers – burrito, chips, and water.

Snacks: Fruit – apple, pear, etc.

Dinner: Something with meat and pasta or rice.

Can you guess what the tweaks were? Give it a try, the scroll past this cute picture of a dog to see if you were right. Photo c/o Lisa L Wiedmeier.

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Small Changes

Morning: Workout early, eat a banana and large coffee with two sugars (Dunkies of course).

Add a few hard boiled or scrambled eggs (or egg muffins) to the banana. Cut one sugar from the coffee. 

Lunch: Lunch out with coworkers – burrito, chips, and water.

Have a rice bowl instead of burrito, add guacamole but avoid the chips. Drink water.

Snacks: Fruit – apple, pear, etc.

Dinner: Something with meat and pasta or rice.

Try to replace pasta and rice with vegetables half the time. Sub riced cauliflower for rice. Use potatoes, brussel sprouts, sweet potatoes for starch instead of the grains. Make sure there’s a protein too. 

Caveats

I do have to add a few caveats at the end here. This diet could afford small tweaks because the person is healthy and active and already eating decently (no McDonalds or TV dinners, no huge desserts every day). This approach doesn’t work for all diets, but it does work in some cases. And in those cases, it can make the process of getting healthier seem way less scary.

18 May 2015

More “AND”, Less “OR”

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Side note: This image has nothing really to do with the topic at hand. It’s just funny.

It seems – to me at least – that in the health and fitness world, everyone likes to boil big questions down to dichotomous choices. What’s more important for weight loss, diet OR exercise? Should I follow a paleo diet OR eat less meat? Is CrossFit better OR should I be running?

Dan Heath, a very smart business guy who wrote a couple of books with his brother on decision making, spoke at the IHRSA Convention a few years ago, and emphasized the importance of “yes, and”. We talk about this a lot at work when we’re planning projects for the coming year, trying not to limit ourselves with false dichotomies. It wasn’t until I saw a recent article on exercise being “pointless” (or some such dismissive word) for weight loss that I put the two together.

You see, it doesn’t have to be diet OR exercise. I foresee very few situations in which a person truly has to make a feet to the fire choice between just one or just the other. If you want to lose weight you should clean up your diet AND get plenty of exercise (at least 150/75 minutes of moderate/vigorous exercise a week for baseline health, more for weight loss). If you’re interested in a sustainable diet, you can go paleo/primal AND eat less meat. They’re called vegetables, and you should eat far more of them than you eat meat. If you want to be in the best shape possible, you should do CrossFit AND you should also go running sometimes. You don’t have to choose between eating organic fruit and exercising daily. You don’t have to choose between coming to CFB 6 days a week or running on the treadmill at 6.3 mph 6 days a week.

Asking the “either, or” question limits what we can do and achieve. So unless your question is “should I eat a cannoli OR an ice cream sandwich for dessert tonight,” you should be thinking AND far more than OR.

PS. I vote cannoli. There’s a Mikes in Harvard Square now.

Photo c/o https://www.flickr.com/photos/brazucany/

Today is, apparently according to the Today Show, National Eat Whatever You Want Day. My first reaction was, well…

But then I realized I basically eat what I want most days. Maybe not whatEVER I want, but for the most part I don’t dread lunch, I don’t hate breakfast, and my dinner isn’t boring. I like what I eat, and it’s not like I’d actually enjoy eating a cheeseburger everyday. There is a way to eat healthy AND like what you’re eating. I think that’s actually something the Paleo community has done better than any other diet – instead of trying to make some sort of frankenfood no carb no calorie bread or tortilla, they just said F the grains, let’s use delicious herbs and spices to make meat and vegetables taste amazing. Or, let’s repurpose vegetables into old favorite (e.g. Cauliflower rice or “mashed potatoes”). For many, that focus on good food is what makes Paleo sustainable – if your Paleo diet is grilled chicken and broccoli most of the time, you’re either one of those weird people who don’t much care what they eat, or you’re going to run into trouble.

There’s a quote I remember hearing (I don’t remember who said it) that went something like:

“Happiness isn’t having everything you want. It’s wanting everything you have.”

I think that’s a relevant message when it comes to diet. It’s not about being able to eat the things you love when your habits aren’t ideal and achieve your goals, it’s about wanting the foods that are healthy. About choosing baked sweet potato wedges over Ore Ida fries, or choosing cage free eggs and fruit over a waffle. About wanting a healthy, home cooked meal more than you want Shake Shack.  And LIKING that choice.

Photo c/o TMAB2003

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If you’ve read my blog long enough, you know my skepticism of the US food system is pretty healthy. Just this weekend I was shopping for chicken, and stumbled upon the lovely scene above. In just this frame alone the word “natural” is used over 5 times. And that’s only part of the chicken section! I’ve written before about how “natural” basically means nothing, but it is nonetheless confusing. I am always telling people to eat foods closest to their natural form, meaning cheese versus Cheez-Its (although eating them a few times a year at the beach isn’t going to kill you) or roasted potatoes versus potato chips. Generally the “closer to earth” (I will avoid using the word natural because like I said, it means squat) variations of a food are less calorically dense and contain more nutritional value (and nutritional bang for your calorie). So the question is: how do you choose the right meat when everything is labeled natural?

The Best

The best way to get humanely raised, non CAFO beef, chicken, eggs, and pork is to buy it from your local farmer. Visit the farm or farmer’s market and buy it on the spot, or join a meat CSA. Take a look at how the farmer does things – how much time to cows hang out outside. Do chickens get to eat bugs? Look at the egg yolk – it should be more orange than yellow. And make sure the cows have plenty of room to rut around and get muddy. That’s natural for them. Side note: there’s a lot of irony in the fact that this “all vegetarian fed chicken” is promoted as “natural”. In nature (or on the farm), chickens eat bugs. They’re not vegetarians, and it’s not good for them, and may explain higher rates of illness and tendency to turn on each other among industrially raised chickens. This Chicago Tribune article sheds more light and is highly recommended. Seriously, READ THIS. Mainly because I feel strongly and want you to, too.

Back to our topic. As is usual, the right way is also the most expensive option. Patrick and I are currently trying to buy better meats, and this summer our goal is to get all our meat from a local farmer. Hopefully we can also make rent :)

If the above option is too many dinero, then…

The Next Best Thing

After getting it right from Old McDonald, the next best option is buying organic. I’m not super familiar with all of the ins and outs of organic regulations, and I’ve heard buzz recently about organic foods still containing some chemicals and maybe not being as rigorous as we thought.  I haven’t done enough digging to decide if this is a Food Babe rumor or a real concern, but it doesn’t change the fact that organically raised meat is still better than conventional farming right now when it comes to meat. So if you can’t get it form your local farmer, get it from a grocery store that buys from an organic farmer somewhere.

If all organic all the time doesn’t fit,

Buy Organic As Much As Possible

Figure out what works for your budget, and buy organic when you can, conventional the rest of the time. I would start with organic dairy and butter, as those won’t add too much to the grocery bill. Move onto eggs next. Then go to meats, as those are probably going to be the biggest increase.

29 Apr 2015

What Does Vitamin C Actually Do?

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We see vitamin C a lot these days, mostly in the context of cold prevention (or treatment). Vitamin C is a water soluble vitamin found in certain foods and added as fortification to others. Humans don’t synthesize vitamin C, so it’s essential that we include it in our diet.

Roles of Vitamin C

Vitamin C is essential for the synthesis of collagen, L-Carnitine, and some neurotransmitters, and is also involved in some protein metabolism. It is also an antioxidant thought to help regenerate other antioxidants like vitamin E, helps the body absorb non-heme iron (meaning iron from plant based foods), and plays an important role in immune function. Vitamin C deficiency results in scurvy (often linked to pirates and sailors, who went long periods without fresh produce), which causes fatigue and connective tissue weakness.

Collagen synthesis and immune function are the most notable and widely recognized roles for Vitamin C. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the body, found in muscle, bone, and tendons among other important tissues.

When Do You Need Vitamin C?

Vitamin  C has been linked to a few conditions over the years.

Cancer Prevention  – numerous studies show that a diet high in fruits and vegetables lowers the risk of many cancers, although similar to vitamin A, there is no research that demonstrates vitamin C alone is responsible for this reduced risk or that supplementation would offer any benefit. It seems the pattern of eating fruits and vegetables is more important than single nutrients.

Cardiovascular Disease – research suggests that higher consumption of fruits and vegetables reduces the risk of heart disease, potentially due in part to the antioxidant content of these foods. This makes sense because oxidative damage is one of the causes of heart disease. One British study found that those with the top 25% in blood vitamin C levels had a 42% risk of cardiovascular disease, but the Physicians Health Study found no significant decrease after 5 years of supplementation.  Most clinical interventions and several larger prevention studies have showed no benefit from supplements. As with cancer, you are better off eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables than supplementing one single nutrient.

The Cold – evidence indicates that vitamin C intake greater than 200 mg a day does not prevent a cold. One study showed a small reduction in cold duration – 8% for adults and 14% for kids. Although if you think about the common cold lasting about 2 weeks, that adds up to about a day. Taking vitamin C after symptoms have already started provided no benefit. Research has shown vitamin C intake of 250 mg – 1 g/day to reduce the incidence of a cold by 50% among people exposed to large bouts of physical exercise and extreme cold – including marathoners, soldiers, and skiers. So, it would appear supplementation is mostly effective for people exposed to extreme environments.

How Much Do You Need?

According to recommended daily allowance (RDA) – a level that should be sufficient to meet the needs of 98% of the population –  the average adult male needs 90 mg a day and the average female 75 mg a day. This is super easy to attain, and most people get way more than that. If you eat 1/2 cup of red bell pepper, a cup of broccoli, and a glass of OJ, you’re already well over 200% of your daily recommended intake.

My Recommendation?

Eat your fruits and veggies. If you ski a lot in the winter, consider taking a supplement if you get sick often. Once you are sick though, forget about the vitamin C. Consider taking a zinc lozenge instead. Or just sleep and drink a lot of fluids.

One caveat: I do often recommend – and take myself – EmergenC when sick. I know, I just said vitamin C does not good, why would I recommend a supplement with 1,000 milligrams of it right? Well, for one because it makes me feel better. It has other vitamins besides vitamin C (including B6 and B12), and because it makes me drink more water. I like it because it works for me, even if the Vitamin C isn’t the reason.

Source: http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminC-HealthProfessional/

Image c/o Keith Williamson 

Since we have a throw down coming up this weekend – and presumably a few more this summer – I thought this old post on what to eat when you’re competing would come in handy. I believe this was posted around the Open last year. Share your competition fueling plan in the comments!

Before The WODs

Before a workout, your body should have a topped off fuel tank. This means you should have enough glycogen (the body’s stored form of carbohydrate) stored as well as some more readily available from food. In general, pre workout meals or snacks should be:

  • Enough energy to prepare you for the workout without leaving you hungry or with undigested food in your stomach
  • Low in fiber and fat
  • Higher in carbohydrates
  • Moderate in protein

Meals low in fat and fiber will allow your stomach to empty in time so you can avoid stomach discomfort. The carbohydrates will top off glycogen stores (which is important, since the body relies on glycogen rather than fat stores for energy during shorter CrossFit WODs), maintain blood sugar levels, and provide energy.  Protein will help you avoid hunger. In addition, it is important to be hydrated before exercise. The recommendation is that athletes drink 2-3 milliliters of water per pound of body weight at least 4 hours before working out to hydrate and get rid of any excess fluid (Rodriguez et al 2009).

After The WODs

Post Workout/Recovery is the most important time, as it is the time when your body reaps the benefits of all the hard work you’ve done. During the workout your body burns through your stored glycogen, you lose fluid to sweating, and muscle tissue is broken down. Recovery is when you can replenish your stored glycogen, replace lost fluid, and rebuild damaged muscles.

We used to think the precise timing of recovery was very important, advising that within one hour of a workout you had to have 30-60 grams of carbohydrate and15-20 grams of protein because this was during the time your metabolism was most active. The consensus was that eating right after the workout improved muscle strength and hypertrophy. However now we know that eating within this window is less important than previously thought (Schoenfeld et al). So, as long as you eat a good, nutrient rich (read: lots of vegetables and fruits) meal with protein and carbohydrates, and maintain an adequate calorie intake throughout the day, you will continue to build strength and fitness.

What To Eat

Try to eat something that not only provides these nutrients but also provides vitamins and minerals. Research has shown that chocolate milk may be a good recovery option because the milk provides calcium and magnesium, two minerals important in muscle contractions, and potassium, which is an important electrolyte lost in sweat. Other good options include a veggie omelet with fried plantain, sweet potato, or wheat toast and grilled steak with roasted vegetables.

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I stumbled on an article in Gawker yesterday by syndicated fitness columnist from the Chicago Tribune James Fell that was too funny not to share. It is an excellent rant about dark chocolate that can be applied to any food with a health halo, and with enough swearing to make a CrossFitter happy. But, amusement aside, I also share this because it makes a bunch of great points.

Remind me again, what are health halos?

“Health halos” result when a healthy quality of a food (say, the fact that it is organic) is viewed in such a way that it seems to make any food to which it is applied seem healthier than it is. For example, organic grapes are a great choice – grapes are a healthy source of sugar and fiber and since they have a permeable skin, it’s a good idea to buy them organic (they are on the dirty dozen list). However being “organic” doesn’t make brownies or candy any healthier than non-organic brownies and candy. I’ve often used the paleo example as well – a paleo meal can be healthy, but paleo chocolate truffles not so much.

What does this have to do with dark chocolate?

Dark chocolate is marketed as “healthy” or “healthier” because it has flavonoids, which are linked to lower risk of heart disease. The problem is that you’d have to eat a LOT of dark chocolate to get any risk reducing benefit from those flavonoids. Nonetheless, as Fell’s article notes:

For about a decade, the sales of dark chocolate have soared, regardless of the fact that it tastes like someone melted down a bunch of brown crayons, mixed it with charcoal and then let it solidify into bar form. Why the boost? As a senior VP from Hershey said in 2006 of the 37% spike in sales of their Special Dark, “There are underlying benefits with the consumption of cocoa that give consumers the permission to enjoy chocolate.”

Wait. “Permission to enjoy chocolate”? Just… fuck you.

Exactly. Of course, as Fell says, if you like dark chocolate, go about your business. I tend to recommend it because it is richer than milk chocolate, so you can enjoy a treat without going overboard. Then again, I happen to like but not love dark chocolate so that works for me. As I’ve said often before, what works for one hardly works for everyone.

But if you don’t really like dark chocolate (not even a little bit), and you just eat it because it’s the healthy kind of chocolate (or if you just want to laugh a little), please read his article over at Gawker.

CrossFit knock aside, it’s hilarious and makes great points.

Image c/o Christi

For those unfamiliar, Food Babe is a consultant turned health/food blogger and public speaker whose mission it is to investigate and uncover “what’s really in our food”. Until this week I don’t think I ever paid her much attention. I knew she had a book out, and I may even have shared a graphic she made about pumpkin spice lattes with some commentary on how they’re not the best thing for your health. I’ve also heard some rumblings in the health professional community about her, mostly along the lines of she’s unqualified and uses fear mongering tactics to spread misinformation. But there’s a lot of people that educate themselves on the internet and pose as experts under the guise of inspiration, recipe sharing, and blogging.

Then I read this article in Gawker, entitled “The ‘Food Babe’ Is Full Of Shit”. It is a robust discrediting by another female blogger with a background in Chemistry and forensic science and toxicology. The health professional in me always trusts science backgrounds over Google prowess, I also appreciate skepticism about our current food system. So, is Food Babe, whether she is full of *%it or not, a good thing or a bad thing?

In Favor of Food Babe: There’s a lot wrong with the way food is produced and consumed in the US. Things banned in Europe are still in our food (seriously, if you can make it without something the Euros think isn’t safe why not just do it that way all the time?), food label claims are often bogus (“all natural” Cheetos anyone?), and there’s little government regulation. A crusader using social pressure to improve our food system should be welcomed.

Food Babe Issues: My issue with her is this: she is very easily discredited, as the article shows. She does use fear mongering tactics, which do no one any good. A lot of people can’t afford organic food, and scaring them into thinking they’re actively murdering their kids by feeding them conventional green beans is a bit too extreme for me. And like I mentioned, she’s easy to discredit. She has written (and removed once her mistakes were called out) articles on how air in airplanes has too much nitrogen (air IS majority nitrogen, a fact she apparently missed) and how your microwave is basically a nuclear reactor. Sometimes journalists don’t fact check (see: Rolling Stone debacle) but someone purporting to have expertise should not make such wildly inaccurate claims.

I also do disagree with her tactics. She takes things wildly out of context, and makes it easy for the industry to fight back and win the public debate in the future. A mad lib of what I predict:

Food Babe: We should all stop eating X Food by Y Big Food Company because it contains (insert chemical approved by the FDA for a certain functionality in food processing) which is also found in/used for (some other scary/non-edible item or use which is totally out of context).

Y Big Food Company: This product has been deemed safe by the FDA and tested by our food science department. These claims are wildly inaccurate and put forth by someone who thinks your microwave is the A-bomb. Who do you trust, SCIENCE or her?

Big Food 1, Food advocates 0.

Here’s the thing: questioning what’s in our food is important. Pressuring food companies to remove unsafe products is important. Voting with our wallets for items like free range eggs, humanely raised meat, and supporting local farmers is all important. But we have to pick our battles and use solid ammunition. Because yes, Subway’s dough thickening agents IS used in yoga mats. But is that what makes Subway a poor food choice? Or is it factory farm meat that is high in sodium, white bread, and the potato chips and cookie that accompany the sandwich? While it may sound weird to say “there’s a yoga mat ingredient in my bread”, I don’t think THAT is what is causing obesity, diabetes, and poor health in America.

I think there’s a good analogy here between Food Babe and Ted Cruz. If you follow politics at all, you know he’s kind of a nuts (or as John McCain would say “a wacko bird”). Now, he may have a good point or two about a few specific areas of policy (I haven’ t dug deep enough to actually verify this, so let’s not make this a political fight). But his “the world is on fire”, no grey area, loud mouthed tactics make his message completely unfounded to most people. And while Food Babe has good (even great) intentions, her delivery and tactics will ultimately be counterproductive to her aims. If we want someone to call out the Food Industry on its faults (and we definitely do), it needs to be someone credible.

What do you guys think?

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