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09 Aug 2013

WOD {August 9, 2013}

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  • Gymnastics

    Practice for 20 minutes…

    Muscle ups
    Double unders

  • Metcon

 

  • Metcon (Time)
    Complete 7 rounds for time…

    200m run
    15 Thrusters, 115#/75#

08 Aug 2013

WOD {August 8, 2013}

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  • Weightlifting
  • Deadlift (55%/5, 65%/3, 75%/3, 85%/max reps then back down, Weight)
  • Metcon
  • Metcon (AMRAP – Rounds and Reps)
    Complete as many rounds plus reps in 12 minutes as you can of…

    10 Deadlift, 185#/125#
    10 Step-ups, 24″/20″

The Renegade Rowing Team is training for the Rumble on the River September 14th at CRI!

The Renegade Rowing Team is training for the Rumble on the River, September 14th at CRI!

An easy goal to kick-start a training cycle and get yourself motivated is picking an event to compete in.  As we come to the end of Summer and Fall picks up there are tons of fun competitions to look forward to.  Earlier this year I committed to running a half-marathon in Newport, RI in October.  This week I found out that I received a singles bid to row at the Head of the Charles in October.  Next weekend I’ll be heading up to CrossFit North Shore with CrossFit Boston for a little throwdown action.  Long story short, I have a lot of fun training to look forward to in the coming months.

What are you training for in the next couple of months?

 Who are you training with?  Challenge a training partner to compete with you.  Share what competitions you’re training for to comments!

07 Aug 2013

WOD {August 7, 2013}

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  • Weightlifting
  • Bench Press (55%/5, 65%/3, 75%/3, 85%/max reps then back down, Weight)
  • Metcon
  • Metcon (Time)
    Complete 6 rounds for time…

    Row 500m
    20 Push-ups

06 Aug 2013

Hydration

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Note: I had planned on writing an awesome post on creatine for today. But on Tuesday I made the soul crushing discovery that I have misplaced the USB that has all of my research and documents from 2007 to the present, including all of the reports I’ve done on creatine. So, for now, enjoy this post about hydration, and stay tuned for said awesome post on creatine next week, when I either find my USB or have enough time to re-do all my research. 

photo 3It’s been hot this summer. While we’re flirting with fall weather this week, the weatherman tells me the heat and humidity will be back by the weekend. Dehydration - when your body does not have enough fluid to function normally – happens when you lose more fluid, usually from sweating, than you are able to take in. You are considered to be in a state of dehydration when you lose 2-3% of your body weight in fluid. At a loss over 3% of your body weight – which for a 150 lb person is 4.5 lbs –  you can begin to see impairment in motor function and mental ability – meaning you will start to feel confused, uncoordinated, and fatigued.

How much water do you need? On average you need about 30 milliliters (ml) of fluid per kilogram (kg) of body weight to maintain hydration. For most people this is around 2 liters, or the commonly suggested “8 glasses a day”. However there are many factors that can increase the amount of fluid you need. These include:

  • Weight - People who weigh more need more water. So while a 120-pound athlete needs just under 7 glasses of water per day, his or her 180 pound coach would need a little over 10 glasses to stay well hydrated.
  • Climate - Dehydration can occur in all types of weather. When it is hot you lose more water to sweat, and in colder weather you may not sweat as much but you will lose more fluid during breathing. Yes, you can lose fluid this way! The average person loses about 500 ml, or 2 cups, of water per day simply breathing. And according to one study, you can lose 42% more water, or almost a cup, when you breathe through your mouth instead of your nose.
  • Altitude also increases fluid needs, and experts recommend those exercising at higher altitudes drink 3-4 liters of water per day.

Hydration for Athletes

The number you just found is the amount of water you need before accounting for exercise. During exercise, you will need to drink some extra water. For optimal hydration, and give your body time to get rid of any excess fluid, drink 2-3 ml per pound of body weight 4 hours before exercise. Try to drink 8 ounces of water 15 minutes beforehand, and then continue to drink during the workout. A good rule is to drink enough water so that you feel energized and avoid thirst, but don’t drink so much that you feel full. This usually adds up to around 8-16 ounces per 30-60 minutes of exercise. After training you will have lost some fluid and need to replace it. Generally, the recommendation is to weigh yourself before and after practice, and drink 24 ounces of water for every pound you lost. After a few practices you will get an idea of how much you normally lose, and won’t have to do this very often.

Electrolytes also play an important role in hydration. The most common electrolytes are:

Sodium regulates the total amount of water in the body and maintains the proper function of nervous, muscular, and other systems.

Chloride helps maintain a normal balance of body fluid.

Potassium is responsible for regulating heartbeat and muscle function and is important in neuron function. Extreme high or low potassium levels can cause irregular heartbeat, which can be fatal.

Bicarbonate maintains the right amount of acidity in the blood and bodily fluids. *This is important because muscle cramping is most often related to an accumulation of acid in the muscles.

When you sweat, you lose electrolytes in addition to fluid. Gatorade, and most other recovery drinks, have 100-120 mg of sodium, and the following foods have at least that much, if not more, in a common serving size: salted nuts and seeds, trail mix, deli meat, eggs, most dairy products, canned tuna, humus, olives, pickles, and raw or cooked spinach. Most sports drinks contain about 30-90 mg of potassium, but this electrolyte can be replaced by eating foods such as raw nuts, yogurt, milk (or chocolate milk), fish, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, beans, peaches, and melons. Most of the time, unless you are training for an extended period (greater than 90 minutes) or in very hot or humid weather, sports drinks are generally not needed to maintain hydration and electrolyte balance.

But…don’t overdo it! While it is important to maintain fluid balance and avoid dehydration, it is possible to become over hydrated. This happens when you drink significantly more water than is lost with sweat, causing sodium levels to drop. Your body likes things to be in a nice, balanced place, and when things get too high or too low your body will tell you. Low sodium levels usually mimic heat stroke symptoms, and let you know something is up with dizziness, headaches, nausea, irritability, and confusion. Over hydration happens primarily with endurance athletes (marathon runners or cyclists, for example) and as a power athlete your risk for this is not as high. But it is important to keep in mind, especially if you’ve been hydrating well in hot weather and still feel like you might have heat illness. If this happens to you, stop training, and have a sports drink or eat something salty.

06 Aug 2013

WOD {August 6, 2013}

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  • Metcon (AMRAP – Rounds and Reps)
    Complete as many rounds and reps as possible in 25 minutes

    Run 200m
    5 Ground to overhead, 135#/95#
    15 Sit-ups
    Run 400m
    10 Ground to overhead, 135#/95#
    20 Sit-ups
    Run 800m
    15 Ground to overhead, 135#/95#
    25 Sit-ups
    Run 1600m
    20 Ground to overhead, 135#/95#
    30 Sit-ups

    The volume for the run continues to double while the GTO and sit-ups increase by 5.

    Every 100m is = 10 reps

06 Aug 2013

Hydration

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Note: I had planned on writing an awesome post on creatine for today. But on Tuesday I made the soul crushing discovery that I have misplaced the USB that has all of my research and documents from 2007 to the present, including all of the reports I’ve done on creatine. So, for now, enjoy this post about hydration, and stay tuned for said awesome post on creatine next week, when I either find my USB or have enough time to re-do all my research. 

photo-3-e1372176726929-448x600It’s been hot this summer. While we’re flirting with fall weather this week, the weatherman tells me the heat and humidity will be back by the weekend. Dehydration - when your body does not have enough fluid to function normally – happens when you lose more fluid, usually from sweating, than you are able to take in. You are considered to be in a state of dehydration when you lose 2-3% of your body weight in fluid. At a loss over 3% of your body weight – which for a 150 lb person is 4.5 lbs –  you can begin to see impairment in motor function and mental ability – meaning you will start to feel confused, uncoordinated, and fatigued.

How much water do you need? On average you need about 30 milliliters (ml) of fluid per kilogram (kg) of body weight to maintain hydration. For most people this is around 2 liters, or the commonly suggested “8 glasses a day”. However there are many factors that can increase the amount of fluid you need. These include:

  • Weight - People who weigh more need more water. So while a 120-pound athlete needs just under 7 glasses of water per day, his or her 180 pound coach would need a little over 10 glasses to stay well hydrated.
  • Climate - Dehydration can occur in all types of weather. When it is hot you lose more water to sweat, and in colder weather you may not sweat as much but you will lose more fluid during breathing. Yes, you can lose fluid this way! The average person loses about 500 ml, or 2 cups, of water per day simply breathing. And according to one study, you can lose 42% more water, or almost a cup, when you breathe through your mouth instead of your nose.
  • Altitude also increases fluid needs, and experts recommend those exercising at higher altitudes drink 3-4 liters of water per day.

HYDRATION FOR ATHLETES

The number you just found is the amount of water you need before accounting for exercise. During exercise, you will need to drink some extra water. For optimal hydration, and give your body time to get rid of any excess fluid, drink 2-3 ml per pound of body weight 4 hours before exercise. Try to drink 8 ounces of water 15 minutes beforehand, and then continue to drink during the workout. A good rule is to drink enough water so that you feel energized and avoid thirst, but don’t drink so much that you feel full. This usually adds up to around 8-16 ounces per 30-60 minutes of exercise. After training you will have lost some fluid and need to replace it. Generally, the recommendation is to weigh yourself before and after practice, and drink 24 ounces of water for every pound you lost. After a few practices you will get an idea of how much you normally lose, and won’t have to do this very often.

Electrolytes also play an important role in hydration. The most common electrolytes are:

Sodium regulates the total amount of water in the body and maintains the proper function of nervous, muscular, and other systems.

Chloride helps maintain a normal balance of body fluid.

Potassium is responsible for regulating heartbeat and muscle function and is important in neuron function. Extreme high or low potassium levels can cause irregular heartbeat, which can be fatal.

Bicarbonate maintains the right amount of acidity in the blood and bodily fluids. *This is important because muscle cramping is most often related to an accumulation of acid in the muscles.

When you sweat, you lose electrolytes in addition to fluid. Gatorade, and most other recovery drinks, have 100-120 mg of sodium, and the following foods have at least that much, if not more, in a common serving size: salted nuts and seeds, trail mix, deli meat, eggs, most dairy products, canned tuna, humus, olives, pickles, and raw or cooked spinach. Most sports drinks contain about 30-90 mg of potassium, but this electrolyte can be replaced by eating foods such as raw nuts, yogurt, milk (or chocolate milk), fish, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, beans, peaches, and melons. Most of the time, unless you are training for an extended period (greater than 90 minutes) or in very hot or humid weather, sports drinks are generally not needed to maintain hydration and electrolyte balance.

But…don’t overdo it! While it is important to maintain fluid balance and avoid dehydration, it is possible to become over hydrated. This happens when you drink significantly more water than is lost with sweat, causing sodium levels to drop. Your body likes things to be in a nice, balanced place, and when things get too high or too low your body will tell you. Low sodium levels usually mimic heat stroke symptoms, and let you know something is up with dizziness, headaches, nausea, irritability, and confusion. Over hydration happens primarily with endurance athletes (marathon runners or cyclists, for example) and as a power athlete your risk for this is not as high. But it is important to keep in mind, especially if you’ve been hydrating well in hot weather and still feel like you might have heat illness. If this happens to you, stop training, and have a sports drink or eat something salty.

05 Aug 2013

WOD {August 5, 2013}

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  • Back Squat (55%/5, 65%/3, 75%/3, 85%/max reps then back down, Weight)
  • Metcon

    1. Complete as many reps as possible in 3 minutes
    Burpees

    rest 6 minutes

    2. 5 rounds for time
    10 Pull-ups
    10 Overhead swings, 32kg/24kg

02 Aug 2013

Fire It Up Friday – August 2

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**Reminder** – CrossFit Boston will be closed this Sunday.  The staff is going to be on site at CrossFit Great Barrington.  All members are welcome to come as well.  Here are the details:

9:00-11:00am: Oly Seminar with Coach Neal

11:00-11:30am: TEAM THROWDOWN between CF Boston and CFGB

11:30am-1:30pm: BBQ and beverages

2:30pm: BSO concert @ Tanglewood
Fire It Up! Fire It Up!

Lot’s of personal records being made this week with “Filthy Fifty” and the strength cycle.  It is great to see the progress being made with a plan and some pure determination.  Your efforts are really paying off.

I know that I can speak for the coaches that you all inspire us to keep training hard ourselves.  Watching everyone push to the limits on the air dyne for tabata intervals on Wednesday was especially motivating.  The “paincycle” can be a really potent conditioning tool and you all stood up to the challenge.  Great work!

When Your Not Training

With all the hard work each of you is putting in, be sure to pay close attention to your recovery and nutrition.  Alex had a great post on Wednesday regarding protein powders.  If you missed it you can read it here.  I am a big believer of using protein shakes immediately post workout to aid in recovery.  I am less sore and can come back and train hard again the next day when I adhere to that plan.  I then follow up with another meal about 1.5 hours after my session to get more fat and protein in my body.

I have been getting more sleep lately too.  This is playing a large role in feeling more refreshed in the mornings and being better prepared to perform in my training sessions.  I try to get at least 7 hours of sleep.  On a few occasion I am able to sneak 9+ hours.  That is usually on the nights that it’s my turn to get my daughter to sleep. :-)

If you are not getting at least 7 hours a night, try to block in 15-20 minutes naps during the day.  It will make a difference on how you feel and increase your productivity.  Give a go and let us know how it works for you.

What’s on Tap

Saturday August 3rd
“Kelly”
5 rounds for time
Run 400m
30 Box jumps, 24″/20″
30 Wallball shots, 20#/14#

Sunday August 4th

Closed for event at CrossFit Great Barrington

Monday August 5th
Back Squat – 55%/5, 65%/3, 75%/3, 85%/max reps and then back down

Complete as many reps as possible in 3 minutes
Burpees

rest 6 minutes

5 rounds for time
10 Pull-ups
10 Overhead swings, 32kg/24kg

Tuesday August 6th
Complete as many rounds as possible in 25 minutes
Run 200m
5 ground to overhead, 135#/95#
15 sit-ups
Run 400m
10 ground to overhead, 135#/95#
20 sit-ups
Run 800m
15 ground to overhead, 135#/95#
25 sit-ups
Run 1600m
20 ground to overhead, 135#/95#
30 sit-ups

Wednesday August 7th
Bench press – 55%/5, 65%/3, 75%/3, 85%/max reps and then back down

Complete 6 rounds for time…
500m row
20 push-ups

Thursday August 8th
Deadlift – 55%/5, 65%/3, 75%/3, 85%/max reps and then back down

Complete as many rounds as possible in 12 minutes…
10 Deadlift, 185#/125#
10 Step-ups, 24″/20″

Friday August 9th
Practice muscle ups and double unders for 20 minutes

Complete 7 rounds for time…
200m run
15 Thruster, 115#/75#

Saturday August 10th
Complete every minute on the minute for 15 minutes…
2 snatch @ 75%

“Isabel”
Complete 30 reps for time…
135#/95# Snatch

02 Aug 2013

WOD {August 2, 2013}

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  • Weightlifting
  • Split Jerk (15 minutes to work up to a heavy single, Weight)
  • Metcon
  • Metcon (Time)
    Complete 7 rounds for time…

    500m run
    15 toe to bar


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Athlete of the Month

  • David Kemp

    IMG_1731

    Let’s start with a regret. I wish I had gotten off my ass and joined CrossFit Boston a year ago. Fitness-wise, it had been a rough year since I got out of the Marines and started at HBS (Harvard Business School). Not that I wasn’t working out at all, but what I was doing wasn’t […]

Kid Athlete of the Month

  • ASHLEY SCAFETTA

    IMG_1397

    CrossFit is a sport I believe everyone can participate in. I especially see this in the kid athletes of CrossFit Boston. Every new kid I have the opportunity to coach brings to our community a new perspective. Ashley is a young lady who at 10 years old is already competing in triathlons and is a […]

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