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As many of you have seen, the Custom Fit Meals cooler has made its way to CrossFit Boston!  Through this service, we now have access to fresh, never frozen meals made from quality ingredients. 

Here is what you need to know:

Order at CustomFitMeals.com by the midnight Tuesday deadline for meal pick-ups the following week.  There are two pick-ups per week – Mondays during normal business hours and Thursdays during normal business hours.

About Custom Fit Meals:

All meals are prepared in a fully licensed, USDA-certified commercial kitchen by a team of culinary chefs, delivered safely to CrossFit Boston via refrigerated vehicle, and stored on-site in the Custom Fit Meals cooler.  

There are no contracts or commitments.  All orders are placed week to week.

All meals are made from FRESH, unprocessed ingredients.  Gluten-Free, Primal, and Paleo meals are available.

There are 14-15 menu items offered each week and their menus constantly rotate.  Meals are currently sold in increments of 5.

The service is based on Custom Fit Meals’ founder Mike Clay’s personal weight-loss journey.  He lost 100 pounds using this service and a link to his story is shown below:

https://www.customfitmeals.com/fat2fit/changing-lives-through-nutrition

For anyone interested in trying out this service, enter the coupon code boston when placing your order to receive a 10% discount.

Custom Fit Meals’ nutritional philosophy is based on eating real food – fresh, natural food like lean meats, vegetables and fruit. Their meals are comprised of foods that are nutrient-dense, with lots of naturally occurring vitamins and minerals, as opposed to processed foods that have more calories but less nutrition.

Food quality is important to them, as well.  They maintain the highest standard in selecting the foods that go into their meals.  They use only USDA-certified All Natural chicken, grass-fed beef and bison, all natural turkey, and pastured pork.  They source the majority of these proteins and as much of their fresh produce as possible from local sources. 

The CFM program is not a “diet”.  It’s a lifestyle, based on well-balanced nutrition that gives you what you need to maintain strength, energy, activity levels and a healthy body weight. Each meal they serve contains a lean source of protein, a generous helping of nutrient-dense vegetables and/or fruit, natural sources of quality carbohydrates, and healthy fats.

Their meals are designed to help you establish and maintain a healthy metabolism, and allow you to improve your body composition, energy levels, sleep quality, mental attitude and quality of life. They also help to minimize your risk for a whole host of lifestyle diseases and conditions like diabetes, heart attack, stroke and autoimmune disorders.

All of their meals are “clean”, relying on a foundation of fresh, natural ingredients.  All of their meals are gluten-free, and many of them do not contain other potentially inflammatory ingredients like dairy and legumes.  Best of all, while their meals are extremely healthy, they also taste great.  This is due to the high-quality ingredients they use, along with the expertise of their chefs in combining flavors and advanced cooking techniques to create meals with a wide variety of unique flavors and textures.

A large number of their menu items take the next major step, from a nutritional standpoint, and fall into the “paleo” category.  They believe (and we agree) that paleo is the healthiest, cleanest way we can eat.  While eating paleo might not be for everyone, the folks at Custom Fit Meals feel it is an excellent starting point that allows you to truly determine what foods are best suited to you.  By eliminating as many potential inflammatory foods from your diet as possible and seeing the effect this has on your body and wellness, then slowly adding them back in under a controlled setting, the CFM program can help you determine which specific types of food truly are good for you.

We’re excited to offer this service and look forward to helping you meet your nutrition goals.

custom fit

 

FIRE IT UP with CUSTOM FIT MEALS!

There is a ton of great things happening right now. Allow me to start with announcing we have partnered up with Custom Fit Meals. Here is their pledge:

CFM prepares and delivers fresh, delicious meals made from only the highest quality ingredients.  We specialize in producing Paleo, Primal and clean meals that fit our Nutritional Philosophy.

We use only USDA-certified All Natural, hormone- and antibiotic-free meats.  Our beef is grass-fed Angus, our poultry is cage-free, our pork is pastured, and our produce is sourced locally and organic as often as possible.  We only partner with ranchers that treat their animals humanely and feed them correctly.

Our unmatched variety of meal selections allows you to personalize your menu to fit your lifestyle.  This gives you the convenience you want, the portion control you need, and the quality of ingredients you deserve – all at an affordable price.

CFM GUARANTEE = Quality, Variety & Service + Prices you can Afford

The relationship between CFB and CFM does require a minimum commitment of 10 members. I have tried a couple of the meals and it was very good. The food had a ton of flavor and the portion was very satisfying. If you are someone that has a very busy schedule or if you find it difficult to make the correct choices, Custom Fit Meals will be perfect for you!

Here is how it works.

CrossFit Games Open 14.4 – The Chipper

Week 4 of the Open is here. The muscle up has finally made it appearance. More appropriately for the majority of CFB members, so has Toe 2 Bars. Dave Castro threw us a curveball with adding the rower to the Open for the very first time in history. I LOVE IT!

As has been the case with every Open workout, pacing will play a critical role. How you feel coming off the rower is going to be more important for those that are still struggling with T2B. Most of you will be able to complete 60 calories within 3 minutes and be ok going into the T2B. Today while warming up be sure to feel the pace of the rower and work on transitioning over to the pull up rig. For the T2B really try to focus on that hollow body position and sub maximal efforts. The more you work towards an effort that results in slipping off the bar, the harder it will be to recover the grip strength.

Moving on to the wall ball, attempt to complete the 40 reps in 1-3 sets. Pacing so you can breathe is critical. Your grip will get a much needed break from the first two movements but your legs are going to be tired. Be sure to be accurate and not miss reps b/c you were too fast and out of control.

Cleans for 30 reps. This is it for the majority of you reading this. Set your back, drive through your heels and try to minimize the rest time between reps. If you still have the energy to perform touch and go reps, you will fare better than if you have to perform a quick rep and drop the bar. The fewer sets the better. To hook grip or not to hook grip? I think this will depend on how efficient you are with the clean. If you are a repeat offender of using your arms, then try to use a hook grip to allow a loose but secure grip. If 135 is not a heavy weight and you can keep a loose grip and not pull with the arms on the clean, then give it a go without the hook grip.

Muscle Ups. If you are lucky enough to get this far and you have the ability to perform muscle ups, be sure to have that kip swing dialed in so the arms have as little action in the movement. Return back to the bottom of the dip and “fall” back into the kip swing to load the hip.

GOOD LUCK!!

Programming

With the exception of Carla B (GO CARLA GO!!) the rest of us understand the CrossFit Games season will end for us with 14.5. Because of this, the programming is going to begin our strength phase of training.

There will be a renewed focus on improving strength across the board for all members while still focusing on skill development in areas still lacking across the gym. There will still be a heavy emphasis on met cons as that is the base of what is CrossFit but you will begin seeing shorter and heavier WODS programmed in addition to the classic style of programming that has been emphasized the last couple of months.

WHAT’S ON TAP

Saturday 3/22

1. Push Press – 7×2
Work up to a heavy set of 2 then back off to 90% of that weight and perform 6 more sets.

2. AMRAP 8
10 OH swings, 32kg/24kg
10 Pull ups
5 Front squat, 185/125

Sunday 3/23

1. Run 1 mile (Test)

rest 10 minutes

2. 3 rounds for time
20 DB Split Cleans, 55/35
15 Knee to elbows
10 HR push ups

Monday 3/24

1. Back Squat – 5×3
work up to a heavy set of three and then back off to 90% of that and perform 4 more sets of 3

2. 21-15-9
Calories on the rower
Power Snatch, 135/95

Tuesday 3/25

1. 400m Medball Run – TEST

2. Hand balancing & Hollow body- spend 10 minutes practicing hand balancing and accumulate 100 Hollow rocks

3. AMRAP 5
10 Burpee Box Jumps, 24″/20″
10 Push Jerks, 155/110

rest 3 minutes

AMRAP 5
10 Power Clean, 155/110
10 CTB Pull ups

Wednesday 3/26

1. Bench Press – work up to a heavy set of 5 (not a max)

2. 5 rounds for time
15 OH squats, 115/75
15 Toe 2 bar

Thursday 3/27

1. Deadlift – 3 x 5 work up to a heavy set of 5. Drop down to 90% of that weight and then perform 3 more sets at that weight.

2. “1/2 Mary” – AMRAP10
5 Handstand push ups
10 Pistols (alternating legs each rep)
15 Pull ups

First things first, housekeeping: this Saturday there will be no nutrition session due to the Average Joe’s competition. The session will be held on Friday, January 17th or on Monday, January 20th in the evening. Please comment or email me with your preference!

 

berry-pancakesCarbs. Everyone generally interested in nutrition and healthy eating seems to be talking about carbs these days. But before I tell you all about them, I must address one of my biggest pet peeves and one of the biggest myth that seems to be floating around – the idea that you can “give up carbs”. Let me just say definitively that you cannot. Why? Because they are in everything that is good for you. Fruits. Vegetables. Even whole dairy. Because, you see, “carbs” are not pasta, rice, and baked goods. “Carbs” is really just an abbreviation for carbohydrates – the body’s main source of energy. So, you can give up grains. You can give up starchy carbohydrates. But you can’t really give up ALL carbohydrates. Allow me to explain further…

 

What are carbohydrates?

 

Carbohydrates are molecules made up of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, and can be found in simple or complex structures. They provide fuel and are the body’s most readily available source of energy. 

 

Why do you need them?

 

1270914_10104168540393451_1482221392_oWhen you eat carbohydrates, the body breaks them down into the simple sugar glucose, which is then transported throughout the body to provide energy, fuel important reactions, and maintain blood sugar levels. Any glucose not used immediately is stored in your liver as glycogen. During quick bouts of exercise, like a 100 meter sprint, the body uses glucose as the main source of fuel. But when it needs additional energy during longer workouts, it will draw on its glycogen stores, as well as stored fat, for energy. Having enough glycogen stored up for the body to use will allow you to perform at your best, both in competition and training. On the other hand, not getting enough carbohydrates and energy to meet your needs over an extended period of time can weaken your immune system – meaning you could get sick more often – and make you feel less energetic.

 

Where do you find them?

 

photo 3Carbohydrates come from a variety of sources, and some are better than others. Some of the better sources of carbohydrates include fruits and vegetables, starches like sweet potato, and some whole grains (quinoa, oats, barley). Fruits and vegetables are the best sources of carbohydrates because they have more fiber and other nutrients like vitamins and minerals (that occur naturally, not through fortification) and are less energy dense. Which carbohydrates you choose will depend on your goals (I’ll get to that in a minute).

 

 The carbohydrates to avoid include baked goods, simple sugars (like table sugar and syrups), processed grains (or “white” grains), and other processed snack foods.

 

How many should you be eating?

 

392034_2510639963358_1858750564_nHow much carbohydrate you need depends on the intensity and volume of training, gender, and type of sport. Research indicates that elite (college and professional) athletes need 6-12 grams of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight (weight in kilograms = weight in pounds divided by 2.2). Women and less active athletes will be on the lower end of that range, while men or endurance athletes will be on the higher end. However, most recreational athletes  will need fewer carbohydrates, as they are not training over 2 hours per day as those athletes do. For most people I recommend 3-6 grams/kg of body weight, depending on your training. For example, a runner who does CrossFit twice a week and is trying to maintain weight will want to eat more carbohydrates than someone who does CrossFit four times a week and is trying to lose weight. 

 

The thing about carbohydrates is there is not enough evidence to recommend exact levels to everyone. How much you need depends on your training, weight, and goals, but also on your subjective feelings. Two people might eat the same proportion of carbohydrates, and while one person feels fantastic, the other feels low energy and lethargic. All things considered, if you can’t focus at work you likely need to eat more carbohydrates. 

 

Should You Be Giving Up Grains?

 

During the Transformation Challenge, a lot of us are giving up grains for 6 weeks. But after the challenge, how should you deal with reintroducing them? Or should you at all? Here are a few tips:

  • Keep your weight goals in mind. If you’re trying to lose weight, keeping grains mostly out of your diet  - while allowing yourself greater liberation in other areas – is a good way to cut out unnecessary calories. If you’re trying to gain weight (or have trouble maintaining it), it is much harder to get enough calories and carbohydrates without grains. It’s possible, but far more difficult (and expensive). 

 

  • Keep your fitness goals in mind: Endurance sports will require more carbohydrates than anaerobic sports (like CrossFit). 

 

  • Keep the grains healthy. Even if you do add back in grains, don’t add in the Eggo waffles, Oreos, and white grains. Add back in bread with only a few ingredients in it (less than 5),brown rice, oats, barley, etc.

 

We can talk more about carbs in this week’s nutrition session. Free for anyone who bought (or buys – there’s still time!) my transformation challenge package and $15 to drop in.

1292854_10104168503357671_368462039_o You’re going to eat restaurant or convenience food sometime over the next six weeks. You just are. I mean, maybe you are a freak of nature who is ALWAYS prepared and never feels like socializing. Power to you. But most people are going to run into work lunches, dinner with the girls, happy hour, pure laziness, or some other similar non-ideal situations. And while it’s not always easy, there are strategies for sticking to your diet while you eat out.

 

1. Do some research ahead of time.

 

1601546_10104604919720781_2037852626_nThis will be especially helpful if you’re in a situation like a work lunch, where you don’t want to be this guy who orders your meal like Sally orders dinner in When Harry Met Sally. So look at the menu ahead of time. If you’re just grabbing Panera for lunch, it’s easy to look online for the nutrition facts and ingredients for every food. If it’s a nicer place, the menu likely won’t list all ingredients but they’ll generally indicate what’s in the sauce. If you have a few good options identified, you won’t have to study the menu intensely for the right option once you’re there. If you’re really dedicated, you can probably even call ahead and inquire about anything that concerns you.

 

2. Stick to the basics.

 

Meat. Vegetables. Oil and vinaigrette. You  can usually get a basic steak or fish and side of vegetables or basic salad at at most places.

 

3. Don’t go to Cracker Barrel (or any place like it).

 

Or any place like it. Look, while I”m of the firm belief you can make a good choice or a bad choice almost anywhere, I’m also fairly convinced (despite the guy who lost 37 pounds eating only McDonald’s) that some places just don’t offer anything worth buying. A few months ago Patrick and I were starving and driving through the middle of rural New Hampshire, so we stopped at Cracker Barrel. We figured it was better than Wendy’s, right? And I had pretty good memories of playing checkers when I was a kid. But the food was awful – processed, cheap, and not even appealing. Your sides of vegetables were maybe 1/3 cup while you got almost a whole plate of white pasta. My point being, even when you order the best thing on the menu there, it’s a far cry from a healthy meal. So avoid places like that as much as you can. Better places include Chipotle or Panera, where you can get a decent salad.

 

 

The Best Meal Ideas

 

  • If you’re at a fast food joint (Panera, Sebastian’s, Chipotle…) – go for the basic salad. Lettuce, meat, beans, veggies, avocado, etc.
  • If you’re at a nicer place – steak, fish, or chicken and a side of vegetables, sans any featured sauces. If you’re not on the transformation challenge but still trying to stay healthy, you can add a side of roasted potatoes if they have them.
  • If you’re at a sports bar – bun-less burger topped with lettuce, tomato, and onion, mustard, and avocado with a side of vegetables.
  • If you’re skiing/riding – chili. Almost every ski lodge has it,  and it’s usually mostly beans, meat, veggies, and tomato sauce. Yes that sauce might have sugar in it, but it might be the best non-salad item you can get there. I don’t know about you but salad doesn’t sound so good when I’m coming off the slopes freezing with ice down my back.

 

The Best Drink Ideas

 

RedWineTo be perfectly clear, none of the below booze-y beverages are transformation challenge compliant. But if you must have a drink (no judgement here, it is football season afterall…) these are going to be the best options.

 

 

  • If  you want to appear social but don’t feel like alcohol – seltzer water with lime. Because sometimes “why aren’t you drinking?” and “ugh you diet too much” get old. Order the soda water with lime and you can fly under the radar in social situations without playing paleo 20 questions.
  • If you want the booze – red wine is the best choice here. Yeah, yeah, Rob Wolf says tequila is paleo. And I’m pretty sure that’s because he likes tequila and recognizes (correctly) that in our world abolishing all alcohol is unrealistic for most. But red wine is the one with science-demostrated heart health benefits, so I’d stick with the Merlot/Cabernet.

 

In short, if you do some research ahead of time and stick to basic meat and veggie dishes, you can absolutely enjoy a nice meal out with friends or a date without abandoning your diet. What’s your go-to paleo-approved restaurant meal?

 

REMINDER: I’ll be hosting a group meeting this Saturday 1/11/14 at 12 pm.  Free to anyone buying the transformation challenge nutrition package and $15 to drop in. Hope to see you there! Email me at [email protected] for more details.

5905454471_7e0ce0ef97_nFor most people, a jar of multivitamins on your countertop is a marker of a healthy person. Of course, I have always been convinced that you can get all the nutrients you need from food if you eat the right foods. Looks like science might be proving my point. An article yesterday from Science Daily reported on 2 articles published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, which found that taking a daily vitamin/mineral supplement really has no clear benefit for most healthy people.

 

What does this mean?

 

This means you don’t need to spend $17.99 a month for vitamins at CVS. It means vitamins and minerals do the most for your body when they come from food.

 

Where do I get my vitamins and minerals?

 

From food, duh. These foods in particular…

 

  • Vitamin A – orange and red colored vegetables like red and orange bell pepper, sweet potato, carrots, pumpkin, cantaloupe, apricots, tomatoes, etc as well as broccoli, ricotta cheese, and black eyed peas.

 

  • B Vitamins (riboflavin, niacin, etc) – green leafy vegetables, fortified grains (but the vegetables are a way better  option).

 

  • Vitamin B12 – animal products, including meat, dairy, and eggs.

 

  • Folate – beef liver, green vegetables including spinach, asparagus. brussel sprouts,and lettuce, and avocado.

 

  • Vitamin C – strawberries, citrus fruits, kiwi, broccoli, brussel sprouts

 

  • Vitamin D – fatty fish like swordfish, salmon, and tuna, fortified OJ, fortified milk, sardines, and egg (found in the yolk).

 

  • Vitamin E – sunflower seeds, almond, peanut butter, safflower oil, and boiled spinach and broccoli.

 

  • Vitamin K – green leafy vegetables; the darker the vegetable, the more vitamin K.

 

  • Iron – red meat, dark green leafy vegetables like spinach and kale,

 

When Should I take a vitamin/mineral supplement?

 

This study found that in healthy people, daily vitamin and mineral supplements aren’t really necessary. However, it IS a good idea to take a vitamin or mineral supplement in some cases. Some of these include:

  • If you have a vitamin deficiency. If the deficiency is low enough, you may be able to correct it by taking a multivitamin that includes that nutrient. If you are very deficient in a vitamin, your doctor may recommend more aggressive supplementation (for example, if you have severe iron deficiency anemia). Of course, while you are correcting the deficiency with a supplement, you will also want to increase your intake of foods high in that nutrient so you don’t become deficient again later on.

 

  • If you are at high risk for vitamin deficiency. Vegans – and sometimes vegetarians – need to supplement B12, because it is only found in animal products, while female athletes are at a higher risk for iron deficiency and northerners (that’s us!) are at high risk of vitamin D deficiency during the winter months due to minimal sunlight exposure.

 

  • If you are pregnant. Since research has very clearly demonstrated the benefits of folate for preventing spina bifida and other neurological disorders in newborns, mothers are encouraged to take folate while they are pregnant.

 

If you’d like to read more for yourself, here’s the article from Science Daily.

 

What are your thoughts on multivitamin/mineral supplements?

 

On Saturday I talked about the nutrition piece of the Transformation Challenge, but if you missed it, here’s a recap.

 

Qualities of a Healthy Diet

 

1. Unprocessed foods. Eat what came from nature – vegetables, fruits, quality meat and dairy (I’ll elaborate on that in #3), nuts and seeds, beans, etc. Avoid things that come in a box like processed wheat, crackers, cookies, chips, sweets, etc. 

 

2. Dominance of fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables are high in nutrients (vitamins, minerals, fiber) but low in calories and mostly low in carbohydrates (except for the starchy ones). That means they are unlikely to cause sharp rises in blood glucose, leaving you with stable energy levels. 

 

For the challenge, all common vegetables are included except for white potatoes – but sweet potatoes, butternut squash, pumpkin, etc are all OK. We’re keeping white potatoes off the OK list because sometimes it can be easy to eat them in place of green vegetables, and they are higher on the glycemic index. I explain more about white potatoes in this post

 

3. Quality meat and dairy. I’ve said before that you want your food to come from happy cows, chickens, and pigs, not sad ones. A lot of meat in the US is made in factory farms, where animals are fed “all vegetarian diets” (don’t let that fool you – chickens should actually be eating insects too) of corn and soy and pumped full of antibiotics to prevent diseases rampant in the close quarters they’re kept in. Choose organic, grass-fed cows and free range chickens and eggs. Bison is also a good option, as they are naturally grass-fed (thank goodness we haven’t put them in factories yet!). 

 

4. Fat +fiber = fullness. Both fat and fiber keep food in your stomach longer, keeping you full longer. This is an important part of avoiding hunger.

 

5. Avoid “starvation hunger” or “hangry-ness”. Aside from eating fat and fiber regularly, try to eat every 4 hours or so and avoid skipping meals. It’s easier to make healthy decisions when you’re just a little hungry and a packed lunch is in the kitchen ready to be heated up, than when you haven’t eaten in 7 hours and you are dreaming of cheeseburgers and Chipotle burritos. 

 

6. Be prepared and DIY. Making your own food at home is the best way to be assured that it is healthy. In addition, keep snacks on hand in case you need them. Almonds, dried fruit (with no added sugar), fresh fruit that keeps well (apples are good), plain yogurt, etc are all good snacks to keep on hand. If you can’t refrigerate, though, nuts are usually easiest.

 

Transformation Challenge Nutrition Package

 

During the challenge, I am offering some extra help. For $75 you will receive:

 

  • A 3-day meal planning template for 1800, 2300, or 2800 calories to help you plan meals
  • Recipes and quick, easy meal ideas
  • 5 group sessions – nutrition lesson and open discussion (meeting Saturdays throughout the challenge, except 1/18 when myself and others will be competing)
  • Weekly email check ins.

 

In addition, if you’d like to drop in to one of the group sessions without buying the whole package, you can do so for $15.

 

If you’d like to purchase a nutrition package, email me at [email protected]

03 Dec 2013

Got Leftover Turkey? Make This

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By Sunday night, I (and probably most of us) had finished up several days of eating and family and now find ourselves with a fridge full of turkey. I find that holiday food gets boring after  a while, so I like to re-purpose it whenever I can. So when I found myself with a pound of smoked turkey, I threw together this soup.

 

Ingredients

 

  • 1-2 tsp olive oilphoto 1-2
  • 4 carrots, chopped
  • 5 celery stalks, chopped
  • 1 sweet onion, chopped 
  • 1 clove garlic, diced
  • 3 cups turkey, shredded
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 1/4 tsp sage
  • 8 cups chicken broth

 

Directions

 

Heat oil in a large pot. Add carrots, celery, onion, and garlic and cook about 4 minutes. Add the spices and mix well, then add the turkey and mix again. Add the broth and bring to a boil, then reduce to low heat and cook for 10 minutes.

photo 2

What do you make with leftover holiday food?

26 Nov 2013

Tips For A Healthier Turkey Day

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Thanksgiving marks the first feast of the many you’ll eventually have during a typical holiday season. While Thanksgiving is a time to eat good food, celebrate family and cultural traditions, and enjoy being around loved ones, it can be those things without completely derailing the diet you’ve been crushing lately. Because, the holidays don’t have to be a 6 week hiatus from all healthy habits. Here are a few tips to help you stay on track AND enjoy delicious, tasty foods this holiday season.

 

Tip 1: Designate Your “Cheat Days”

 

You remember when I wrote about cheat days right? Well, if you don’t have time to read it, let me sum it up for you: cheat days have beneficial effects on hormone levels and mood that can help you in the weight loss or maintenance process – if done right. So pick a few cheat days. Maybe, say 6 over the next 6 weeks. For example, mine will probably be

 

  • Thanksgiving Day
  • Gym Holiday Party
  • Work Holiday Party
  • Christmas Eve
  • Christmas Day
  • New Years Eve

 

This way, you have set days to enjoy holiday goodies, and the rest of the time you stick to a healthy diet of plenty of fruits and veggies, lean proteins, healthy fats, and a little dairy.

 

Tip 2: Cheat Right

 

According to the research, the best cheat day meals (to have those beneficial effects on hormones) are high in protein and carbs, and lower in fat. Keep this in mind as you eye the spread this Thursday. That means plenty of turkey, potatoes, a dinner roll, and cranberries. Go easy on the butter and heavy casseroles.

 

Tip 3: Keep the Veggies at the Party

 

I know, I know, I just said this should be your cheat day. But “cheat day” doesn’t mean “eat nothing healthy all day”, it just means there’s wiggle room. So make sure you get some veggies on feasting holidays by either eating some throughout the day (spinach in a smoothie at breakfast, raw veggies and guacamole for a snack), or include them in the meal in the form of a side salad or some green beans with toasted almonds. Not only do veggies (and fruits) have important vitamins and minerals, they also have fiber, which will help you digest all that turkey later in the day.

 

 

Tip 4: Spread it Around

 

My favorite thing about Thanksgiving (and Christmas) dinner is….

 

LEFTOVERS! What this means is, you don’t have to eat everything on the table Thanksgiving day. Didn’t make it to the sweet potato casserole? No worries, have a small taste the next day with eggs to fuel your Black Friday adventures. In the photo to the right, you can see an example of this – I paired my sweet potato casserole from a recent Friends-giving with a lean, grilled hamburger over salad.

 

Tip 5: Don’t Stop Moving!

 

This one is important for a few reasons. While I always like to say “you can’t out train a bad diet”, exercise is still really important, especially this time of year. Not only does exercise burn calories, some research has shown that morning exercise may reduce your appetite throughout the rest of the day. So get a morning workout in on Thanksgiving day (maybe a run, a bike ride, or some burpees…) before the Thanksgiving day parade, dog show, and eating begin.

 

Photo 

Checkout the post below from Alex Black of Wicked Good Nutrition for some good info and ideas on what to eat before a workout.

 

Get some ratio at the Renegade Rowing Club starting December 2nd!If you’re interested in joining the Renegade Rowing Club to train for the Renegade Rowing League and CRASH-B’s please register here.  The club starts training Monday, December 2nd at 6:30pm at CrossFit Boston.

What Should I Eat Before a Workout??

 

Deciding what to eat day-to-day can be challenging. Choosing the best thing to eat – a meal that will give you energy to perform without making you feel too full, sick, or hungry – can be even more challenging. Every workout is different, so how you fuel for each one will be different too. You probably wouldn’t eat the same breakfast before a 2K test as you would before a 10 mile run. Read on for some basic pre-workout meal guidelines and some ideas for before a workout.

 

..Read The Rest Here…

 

Then share your favorite pre-workout meal in the comments!

19 Nov 2013

Should You Eat Dairy?

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118970265_b42657315c_mDairy isn’t paleo. Most people who have read about/heard of the paleo diet know that. But WHY isn’t dairy allowed? Is it really that bad for you? I like looking at pros and cons so I’m going to break it down that way.

 

 

Dairy Pros

 

1. If you buy the right stuff, it’s pretty natural. I’m not talking about cheesecake flavored yogurt, ice cream, or strawberry milk. I’m talking about grass-fed milk and butter, plain Greek yogurt, etc. Whole milk is removed from a cow, heated to 145 degrees F for 30 minutes or 162 degrees F for 15 seconds (that is the Pasteurization process) and then bottled. Of course, this can be different at a big factory farm type dairy. But if you are buying organic, grass-fed milk, you’re getting a pretty unprocessed product.

As a side note, milk that has not been pasteurized is called “raw milk”, and its legality is under debate. I’ll tackle raw milk vs. regular milk in another blog post.

 

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2. It’s a staple food in many (rather healthy) countries. Milk and dairy are staples incountries like Germany and Switzerland. These countries also have low obesity rates. Yes, other factors like physical activity (they bike everywhere over there) and agriculture can play a role. The point is, some people drink milk and are perfectly healthy.

 

 

3. Milk and yogurt can be good for recovery (and a good protein source for vegetarians). Milk has 12 grams of carbohydrates and 8 grams of protein per 8 ounce glass. This means 16 ounces of milk provides the right mix of protein and carbs for post workout recovery, in a natural and convenient form.

 

4. Nutrition. Milk and yogurt are good sources of calcium and vitamin D, which help maintain bone density. Milk also contains vitamin A, vitamin C, and B vitamins.

 

Cons 

 

1. Many people are lactose intolerant. According to the NIH, about 65% of adults have a reduce ability to digest lactose (the sugar in milk), but this varies by ethnicity. Among some East Asian populations ,the prevalence of lactose intolerance is 90%, but among Eastern Europeans it’s more like 5%. You can diagnose lactose intolerance with a breath test, but more likely than not if lactose doesn’t agree with you, you’ll know from the bloating and cramping. Because the issue in lactose intolerance is the inability to digest the SUGAR in dairy, lower sugar dairy like cheese tends to be easier to digest.

 

2. Some dairy is highly processed and/or unsustainably and unethically

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 produced. Like I mentioned before, Boston Cream Pie and Cheesecake flavored yoplait and Strawberry milk are still processed foods, even if they decided to stop using High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS).

 

In addition, a lot of dairy in the US is produced by cows in factory farm/ dairy type situations. Cows who don’t have room to graze and exercise. These are sad cows. You shouldn’t get your dairy from sad cows. Look for dairy from happy cows – i.e. organic and/or grass fed milk and butter.

 

3. Milk could, in some context, be considered a high calorie drink. 8 oz of whole milk has 150 calories and 8 grams of fat. While this is better than soda, when you’re trying to lose weight, it’s best to avoid drinking your calories and get them from more filling foods instead. Then again, if you’re trying to put on weight (or maintain it if you have difficulty doing so), the extra calories in milk are a bonus.

 

 

My Advice

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I have nothing against unprocessed dairy – which to me means milk, plain yogurt, butter, and some cheeses. It is not paleo because it only came about around 9,000 years ago. But,as I’ve said before, just because it’s not paleo doesn’t mean it’s not healthy. Obviously, if you have an allergy or intolerance to dairy, you should avoid it. But for most people, it can be part of a quality diet.

 

 

I personally don’t drink a lot of milk (even as a kid I never liked it unless it was in cereal) and eat yogurt, butter, and cheese only occasionally. But if you have no issue digesting lactose and want to incorporate it, 1-2 servings per day is a good amount (1 serving is 6 ounces of yogurt, 8 ounces of milk, 1 ounce of cheese). Choose dairy from happy cows (grassfed and/or organic) and avoid skim, as the fat in milk helps absorb some of the fat soluble vitamins it provides.

 

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