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25 Feb 2014

Eat To Compete

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tumblr_mzwvmiCFBe1rkembbo1_1280As the open approaches, many of us are entering competitor mode. I’m sure Neal and the other coaches will be telling us lots about mobility and recovery, so I’m just going to talk about food. How you eat can seriously impact how you perform. Read on for a few nutrition tips to help you perform your best during the Open.

 

Before The WODs

 

Before a workout, your body should have a topped off fuel tank. This means you should have enough glycogen (the body’s stored form of carbohydrate) stored as well as some more readily available from food. In general, pre workout meals or snacks should be:

  • Enough energy to prepare you for the workout without leaving you hungry or with undigested food in your stomach
  • Low in fiber and fat
  • Higher in carbohydrates
  • Moderate in protein

Meals low in fat and fiber will allow your stomach to empty in time so you can avoid stomach discomfort. The carbohydrates will top off glycogen stores (which is important, since the body relies on glycogen rather than fat stores for energy during shorter CrossFit WODs), maintain blood sugar levels, and provide energy.  Protein will help you avoid hunger. In addition, it is important to be hydrated before exercise. The recommendation is that athletes drink 2-3 milliliters of water per pound of body weight at least 4 hours before working out to hydrate and get rid of any excess fluid (Rodriguez et al 2009).

 

After The WODs

 

IMG_0757Post Workout/Recovery is the most important time, as it is the time when your body reaps the benefits of all the hard work you’ve done. During the workout your body burns through your stored glycogen, you lose fluid to sweating, and muscle tissue is broken down. Recovery is when you can replenish your stored glycogen, replace lost fluid, and rebuild damaged muscles.

 

We used to think the precise timing of recovery was very important, advising that within one hour of a workout you had to have 30-60 grams of carbohydrate and15-20 grams of protein because this was during the time your metabolism was most active. The consensus was that eating right after the workout improved muscle strength and hypertrophy. However now we know that eating within this window is less important than previously thought (Schoenfeld et al). So, as long as you eat a good, nutrient rich (read: lots of vegetables and fruits) meal with protein and carbohydrates, and maintain an adequate calorie intake throughout the day, you will continue to build strength and fitness.

 

What To Eat

 

Try to eat something that not only provides these nutrients but also provides vitamins and minerals. Research has shown that chocolate milk may be a good recovery option because the milk provides calcium and magnesium, two minerals important in muscle contractions, and potassium, which is an important electrolyte lost in sweat. Other good options include a veggie omelet with fried plantain, sweet potato, or wheat toast and grilled steak with roasted vegetables. 

 

What’s your favorite post workout meal? 

 

Photo 1 c/o Public Health Memes

IMG_0757In response to our collective interest in eating healthier, food companies have started trying to make healthier products. Well, sort of. They are trying to make products that LOOK and FEEL healthier, though they may not be. Hence the emergence of things like veggie chips and other “natural products”. (As a side note, my biggest pet peeve these days is a bag of veggie chips proudly bragging “1 serving of vegetables in each portion”. Um, NO because fried potato and corn with some salt is not a serving of vegetables! But I digress).

 

What does the natural label mean?

 

natural_cheetosNothing. Squat. The “All Natural” and “Natural” labels on food are not regulated by the FDA or any other organization. Which means unlike labels like Organic and Low Fat, a food sporting Natural claim doesn’t have to meet any type of requirements. If not for worry of public backlash (or lawsuit), M&Ms and Coca Cola could use a Natural label on their soda and candy, too. The good news is, people are starting to recognize this (or at least lawyers are). Last year Naked Juice lost a class action lawsuit claiming that their use of the Natural and All Natural claims, despite the juices containing non-natural things like GMO soy. 

 

How do you know what’s really natural?

 

Look at the ingredients label. If it contains something that don’t sound like they occur immediately in nature (like soy lecithin, GMO products, corn starch, etc), avoid it. And of course, use common sense. Something can claim it’s natural, and contain all ingredients that are, but that doesn’t make it natural. Just like frying some potatoes does not a vegetable serving make (although I can’t make the same argument for home made kale chips).

Brian Taillon liked this post

photoAs many of you have noticed (and lamented), sleep is a big part of the Transformation Challenge. But sleep doesn’t just impact how hard it is to get out of bed or how much coffee you need to survive the day, it can also affect your food choices, sports performance, and long term health. 

 

Sleep occurs in two parts, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. NREM sleep makes up about 75% of sleep time and consists of four stages. Stages 1 and 2 are the beginnings of sleep, when your start breathing more irregularly and begin to disengage from your surroundings. Stages 3 and 4 are the parts of the sleep cycle where the most recovery occurs, as breathing slows, tissues are repaired, energy is restored, and important hormones are released. REM sleep makes up the other 25% of sleep time, usually happening 90 minutes after you fall asleep and recurring every 90 minutes. During REM sleep, energy is provided to the brain and body, the brain is active – this is the part of sleep where dreaming happens – while the body becomes immobile as muscles are turned off.

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First things first, housekeeping: this Saturday there will be no nutrition session due to the Average Joe’s competition. The session will be held on Friday, January 17th or on Monday, January 20th in the evening. Please comment or email me with your preference!

 

berry-pancakesCarbs. Everyone generally interested in nutrition and healthy eating seems to be talking about carbs these days. But before I tell you all about them, I must address one of my biggest pet peeves and one of the biggest myth that seems to be floating around – the idea that you can “give up carbs”. Let me just say definitively that you cannot. Why? Because they are in everything that is good for you. Fruits. Vegetables. Even whole dairy. Because, you see, “carbs” are not pasta, rice, and baked goods. “Carbs” is really just an abbreviation for carbohydrates – the body’s main source of energy. So, you can give up grains. You can give up starchy carbohydrates. But you can’t really give up ALL carbohydrates. Allow me to explain further…

 

What are carbohydrates?

 

Carbohydrates are molecules made up of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, and can be found in simple or complex structures. They provide fuel and are the body’s most readily available source of energy. 

 

Why do you need them?

 

1270914_10104168540393451_1482221392_oWhen you eat carbohydrates, the body breaks them down into the simple sugar glucose, which is then transported throughout the body to provide energy, fuel important reactions, and maintain blood sugar levels. Any glucose not used immediately is stored in your liver as glycogen. During quick bouts of exercise, like a 100 meter sprint, the body uses glucose as the main source of fuel. But when it needs additional energy during longer workouts, it will draw on its glycogen stores, as well as stored fat, for energy. Having enough glycogen stored up for the body to use will allow you to perform at your best, both in competition and training. On the other hand, not getting enough carbohydrates and energy to meet your needs over an extended period of time can weaken your immune system – meaning you could get sick more often – and make you feel less energetic.

 

Where do you find them?

 

photo 3Carbohydrates come from a variety of sources, and some are better than others. Some of the better sources of carbohydrates include fruits and vegetables, starches like sweet potato, and some whole grains (quinoa, oats, barley). Fruits and vegetables are the best sources of carbohydrates because they have more fiber and other nutrients like vitamins and minerals (that occur naturally, not through fortification) and are less energy dense. Which carbohydrates you choose will depend on your goals (I’ll get to that in a minute).

 

 The carbohydrates to avoid include baked goods, simple sugars (like table sugar and syrups), processed grains (or “white” grains), and other processed snack foods.

 

How many should you be eating?

 

392034_2510639963358_1858750564_nHow much carbohydrate you need depends on the intensity and volume of training, gender, and type of sport. Research indicates that elite (college and professional) athletes need 6-12 grams of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight (weight in kilograms = weight in pounds divided by 2.2). Women and less active athletes will be on the lower end of that range, while men or endurance athletes will be on the higher end. However, most recreational athletes  will need fewer carbohydrates, as they are not training over 2 hours per day as those athletes do. For most people I recommend 3-6 grams/kg of body weight, depending on your training. For example, a runner who does CrossFit twice a week and is trying to maintain weight will want to eat more carbohydrates than someone who does CrossFit four times a week and is trying to lose weight. 

 

The thing about carbohydrates is there is not enough evidence to recommend exact levels to everyone. How much you need depends on your training, weight, and goals, but also on your subjective feelings. Two people might eat the same proportion of carbohydrates, and while one person feels fantastic, the other feels low energy and lethargic. All things considered, if you can’t focus at work you likely need to eat more carbohydrates. 

 

Should You Be Giving Up Grains?

 

During the Transformation Challenge, a lot of us are giving up grains for 6 weeks. But after the challenge, how should you deal with reintroducing them? Or should you at all? Here are a few tips:

  • Keep your weight goals in mind. If you’re trying to lose weight, keeping grains mostly out of your diet  - while allowing yourself greater liberation in other areas – is a good way to cut out unnecessary calories. If you’re trying to gain weight (or have trouble maintaining it), it is much harder to get enough calories and carbohydrates without grains. It’s possible, but far more difficult (and expensive). 

 

  • Keep your fitness goals in mind: Endurance sports will require more carbohydrates than anaerobic sports (like CrossFit). 

 

  • Keep the grains healthy. Even if you do add back in grains, don’t add in the Eggo waffles, Oreos, and white grains. Add back in bread with only a few ingredients in it (less than 5),brown rice, oats, barley, etc.

 

We can talk more about carbs in this week’s nutrition session. Free for anyone who bought (or buys – there’s still time!) my transformation challenge package and $15 to drop in.

1292854_10104168503357671_368462039_o You’re going to eat restaurant or convenience food sometime over the next six weeks. You just are. I mean, maybe you are a freak of nature who is ALWAYS prepared and never feels like socializing. Power to you. But most people are going to run into work lunches, dinner with the girls, happy hour, pure laziness, or some other similar non-ideal situations. And while it’s not always easy, there are strategies for sticking to your diet while you eat out.

 

1. Do some research ahead of time.

 

1601546_10104604919720781_2037852626_nThis will be especially helpful if you’re in a situation like a work lunch, where you don’t want to be this guy who orders your meal like Sally orders dinner in When Harry Met Sally. So look at the menu ahead of time. If you’re just grabbing Panera for lunch, it’s easy to look online for the nutrition facts and ingredients for every food. If it’s a nicer place, the menu likely won’t list all ingredients but they’ll generally indicate what’s in the sauce. If you have a few good options identified, you won’t have to study the menu intensely for the right option once you’re there. If you’re really dedicated, you can probably even call ahead and inquire about anything that concerns you.

 

2. Stick to the basics.

 

Meat. Vegetables. Oil and vinaigrette. You  can usually get a basic steak or fish and side of vegetables or basic salad at at most places.

 

3. Don’t go to Cracker Barrel (or any place like it).

 

Or any place like it. Look, while I”m of the firm belief you can make a good choice or a bad choice almost anywhere, I’m also fairly convinced (despite the guy who lost 37 pounds eating only McDonald’s) that some places just don’t offer anything worth buying. A few months ago Patrick and I were starving and driving through the middle of rural New Hampshire, so we stopped at Cracker Barrel. We figured it was better than Wendy’s, right? And I had pretty good memories of playing checkers when I was a kid. But the food was awful – processed, cheap, and not even appealing. Your sides of vegetables were maybe 1/3 cup while you got almost a whole plate of white pasta. My point being, even when you order the best thing on the menu there, it’s a far cry from a healthy meal. So avoid places like that as much as you can. Better places include Chipotle or Panera, where you can get a decent salad.

 

 

The Best Meal Ideas

 

  • If you’re at a fast food joint (Panera, Sebastian’s, Chipotle…) – go for the basic salad. Lettuce, meat, beans, veggies, avocado, etc.
  • If you’re at a nicer place – steak, fish, or chicken and a side of vegetables, sans any featured sauces. If you’re not on the transformation challenge but still trying to stay healthy, you can add a side of roasted potatoes if they have them.
  • If you’re at a sports bar – bun-less burger topped with lettuce, tomato, and onion, mustard, and avocado with a side of vegetables.
  • If you’re skiing/riding – chili. Almost every ski lodge has it,  and it’s usually mostly beans, meat, veggies, and tomato sauce. Yes that sauce might have sugar in it, but it might be the best non-salad item you can get there. I don’t know about you but salad doesn’t sound so good when I’m coming off the slopes freezing with ice down my back.

 

The Best Drink Ideas

 

RedWineTo be perfectly clear, none of the below booze-y beverages are transformation challenge compliant. But if you must have a drink (no judgement here, it is football season afterall…) these are going to be the best options.

 

 

  • If  you want to appear social but don’t feel like alcohol – seltzer water with lime. Because sometimes “why aren’t you drinking?” and “ugh you diet too much” get old. Order the soda water with lime and you can fly under the radar in social situations without playing paleo 20 questions.
  • If you want the booze – red wine is the best choice here. Yeah, yeah, Rob Wolf says tequila is paleo. And I’m pretty sure that’s because he likes tequila and recognizes (correctly) that in our world abolishing all alcohol is unrealistic for most. But red wine is the one with science-demostrated heart health benefits, so I’d stick with the Merlot/Cabernet.

 

In short, if you do some research ahead of time and stick to basic meat and veggie dishes, you can absolutely enjoy a nice meal out with friends or a date without abandoning your diet. What’s your go-to paleo-approved restaurant meal?

 

REMINDER: I’ll be hosting a group meeting this Saturday 1/11/14 at 12 pm.  Free to anyone buying the transformation challenge nutrition package and $15 to drop in. Hope to see you there! Email me at [email protected] for more details.

5905454471_7e0ce0ef97_nFor most people, a jar of multivitamins on your countertop is a marker of a healthy person. Of course, I have always been convinced that you can get all the nutrients you need from food if you eat the right foods. Looks like science might be proving my point. An article yesterday from Science Daily reported on 2 articles published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, which found that taking a daily vitamin/mineral supplement really has no clear benefit for most healthy people.

 

What does this mean?

 

This means you don’t need to spend $17.99 a month for vitamins at CVS. It means vitamins and minerals do the most for your body when they come from food.

 

Where do I get my vitamins and minerals?

 

From food, duh. These foods in particular…

 

  • Vitamin A – orange and red colored vegetables like red and orange bell pepper, sweet potato, carrots, pumpkin, cantaloupe, apricots, tomatoes, etc as well as broccoli, ricotta cheese, and black eyed peas.

 

  • B Vitamins (riboflavin, niacin, etc) – green leafy vegetables, fortified grains (but the vegetables are a way better  option).

 

  • Vitamin B12 – animal products, including meat, dairy, and eggs.

 

  • Folate – beef liver, green vegetables including spinach, asparagus. brussel sprouts,and lettuce, and avocado.

 

  • Vitamin C – strawberries, citrus fruits, kiwi, broccoli, brussel sprouts

 

  • Vitamin D – fatty fish like swordfish, salmon, and tuna, fortified OJ, fortified milk, sardines, and egg (found in the yolk).

 

  • Vitamin E – sunflower seeds, almond, peanut butter, safflower oil, and boiled spinach and broccoli.

 

  • Vitamin K – green leafy vegetables; the darker the vegetable, the more vitamin K.

 

  • Iron – red meat, dark green leafy vegetables like spinach and kale,

 

When Should I take a vitamin/mineral supplement?

 

This study found that in healthy people, daily vitamin and mineral supplements aren’t really necessary. However, it IS a good idea to take a vitamin or mineral supplement in some cases. Some of these include:

  • If you have a vitamin deficiency. If the deficiency is low enough, you may be able to correct it by taking a multivitamin that includes that nutrient. If you are very deficient in a vitamin, your doctor may recommend more aggressive supplementation (for example, if you have severe iron deficiency anemia). Of course, while you are correcting the deficiency with a supplement, you will also want to increase your intake of foods high in that nutrient so you don’t become deficient again later on.

 

  • If you are at high risk for vitamin deficiency. Vegans – and sometimes vegetarians – need to supplement B12, because it is only found in animal products, while female athletes are at a higher risk for iron deficiency and northerners (that’s us!) are at high risk of vitamin D deficiency during the winter months due to minimal sunlight exposure.

 

  • If you are pregnant. Since research has very clearly demonstrated the benefits of folate for preventing spina bifida and other neurological disorders in newborns, mothers are encouraged to take folate while they are pregnant.

 

If you’d like to read more for yourself, here’s the article from Science Daily.

 

What are your thoughts on multivitamin/mineral supplements?

 

CrossFit Boston, Liz Roscillo liked this post

On Saturday I talked about the nutrition piece of the Transformation Challenge, but if you missed it, here’s a recap.

 

Qualities of a Healthy Diet

 

1. Unprocessed foods. Eat what came from nature – vegetables, fruits, quality meat and dairy (I’ll elaborate on that in #3), nuts and seeds, beans, etc. Avoid things that come in a box like processed wheat, crackers, cookies, chips, sweets, etc. 

 

2. Dominance of fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables are high in nutrients (vitamins, minerals, fiber) but low in calories and mostly low in carbohydrates (except for the starchy ones). That means they are unlikely to cause sharp rises in blood glucose, leaving you with stable energy levels. 

 

For the challenge, all common vegetables are included except for white potatoes – but sweet potatoes, butternut squash, pumpkin, etc are all OK. We’re keeping white potatoes off the OK list because sometimes it can be easy to eat them in place of green vegetables, and they are higher on the glycemic index. I explain more about white potatoes in this post

 

3. Quality meat and dairy. I’ve said before that you want your food to come from happy cows, chickens, and pigs, not sad ones. A lot of meat in the US is made in factory farms, where animals are fed “all vegetarian diets” (don’t let that fool you – chickens should actually be eating insects too) of corn and soy and pumped full of antibiotics to prevent diseases rampant in the close quarters they’re kept in. Choose organic, grass-fed cows and free range chickens and eggs. Bison is also a good option, as they are naturally grass-fed (thank goodness we haven’t put them in factories yet!). 

 

4. Fat +fiber = fullness. Both fat and fiber keep food in your stomach longer, keeping you full longer. This is an important part of avoiding hunger.

 

5. Avoid “starvation hunger” or “hangry-ness”. Aside from eating fat and fiber regularly, try to eat every 4 hours or so and avoid skipping meals. It’s easier to make healthy decisions when you’re just a little hungry and a packed lunch is in the kitchen ready to be heated up, than when you haven’t eaten in 7 hours and you are dreaming of cheeseburgers and Chipotle burritos. 

 

6. Be prepared and DIY. Making your own food at home is the best way to be assured that it is healthy. In addition, keep snacks on hand in case you need them. Almonds, dried fruit (with no added sugar), fresh fruit that keeps well (apples are good), plain yogurt, etc are all good snacks to keep on hand. If you can’t refrigerate, though, nuts are usually easiest.

 

Transformation Challenge Nutrition Package

 

During the challenge, I am offering some extra help. For $75 you will receive:

 

  • A 3-day meal planning template for 1800, 2300, or 2800 calories to help you plan meals
  • Recipes and quick, easy meal ideas
  • 5 group sessions – nutrition lesson and open discussion (meeting Saturdays throughout the challenge, except 1/18 when myself and others will be competing)
  • Weekly email check ins.

 

In addition, if you’d like to drop in to one of the group sessions without buying the whole package, you can do so for $15.

 

If you’d like to purchase a nutrition package, email me at [email protected]

03 Dec 2013

Got Leftover Turkey? Make This

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By Sunday night, I (and probably most of us) had finished up several days of eating and family and now find ourselves with a fridge full of turkey. I find that holiday food gets boring after  a while, so I like to re-purpose it whenever I can. So when I found myself with a pound of smoked turkey, I threw together this soup.

 

Ingredients

 

  • 1-2 tsp olive oilphoto 1-2
  • 4 carrots, chopped
  • 5 celery stalks, chopped
  • 1 sweet onion, chopped 
  • 1 clove garlic, diced
  • 3 cups turkey, shredded
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 1/4 tsp sage
  • 8 cups chicken broth

 

Directions

 

Heat oil in a large pot. Add carrots, celery, onion, and garlic and cook about 4 minutes. Add the spices and mix well, then add the turkey and mix again. Add the broth and bring to a boil, then reduce to low heat and cook for 10 minutes.

photo 2

What do you make with leftover holiday food?

26 Nov 2013

Tips For A Healthier Turkey Day

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Thanksgiving marks the first feast of the many you’ll eventually have during a typical holiday season. While Thanksgiving is a time to eat good food, celebrate family and cultural traditions, and enjoy being around loved ones, it can be those things without completely derailing the diet you’ve been crushing lately. Because, the holidays don’t have to be a 6 week hiatus from all healthy habits. Here are a few tips to help you stay on track AND enjoy delicious, tasty foods this holiday season.

 

Tip 1: Designate Your “Cheat Days”

 

You remember when I wrote about cheat days right? Well, if you don’t have time to read it, let me sum it up for you: cheat days have beneficial effects on hormone levels and mood that can help you in the weight loss or maintenance process – if done right. So pick a few cheat days. Maybe, say 6 over the next 6 weeks. For example, mine will probably be

 

  • Thanksgiving Day
  • Gym Holiday Party
  • Work Holiday Party
  • Christmas Eve
  • Christmas Day
  • New Years Eve

 

This way, you have set days to enjoy holiday goodies, and the rest of the time you stick to a healthy diet of plenty of fruits and veggies, lean proteins, healthy fats, and a little dairy.

 

Tip 2: Cheat Right

 

According to the research, the best cheat day meals (to have those beneficial effects on hormones) are high in protein and carbs, and lower in fat. Keep this in mind as you eye the spread this Thursday. That means plenty of turkey, potatoes, a dinner roll, and cranberries. Go easy on the butter and heavy casseroles.

 

Tip 3: Keep the Veggies at the Party

 

I know, I know, I just said this should be your cheat day. But “cheat day” doesn’t mean “eat nothing healthy all day”, it just means there’s wiggle room. So make sure you get some veggies on feasting holidays by either eating some throughout the day (spinach in a smoothie at breakfast, raw veggies and guacamole for a snack), or include them in the meal in the form of a side salad or some green beans with toasted almonds. Not only do veggies (and fruits) have important vitamins and minerals, they also have fiber, which will help you digest all that turkey later in the day.

 

 

Tip 4: Spread it Around

 

My favorite thing about Thanksgiving (and Christmas) dinner is….

 

LEFTOVERS! What this means is, you don’t have to eat everything on the table Thanksgiving day. Didn’t make it to the sweet potato casserole? No worries, have a small taste the next day with eggs to fuel your Black Friday adventures. In the photo to the right, you can see an example of this – I paired my sweet potato casserole from a recent Friends-giving with a lean, grilled hamburger over salad.

 

Tip 5: Don’t Stop Moving!

 

This one is important for a few reasons. While I always like to say “you can’t out train a bad diet”, exercise is still really important, especially this time of year. Not only does exercise burn calories, some research has shown that morning exercise may reduce your appetite throughout the rest of the day. So get a morning workout in on Thanksgiving day (maybe a run, a bike ride, or some burpees…) before the Thanksgiving day parade, dog show, and eating begin.

 

Photo 

Checkout the post below from Alex Black of Wicked Good Nutrition for some good info and ideas on what to eat before a workout.

 

Get some ratio at the Renegade Rowing Club starting December 2nd!If you’re interested in joining the Renegade Rowing Club to train for the Renegade Rowing League and CRASH-B’s please register here.  The club starts training Monday, December 2nd at 6:30pm at CrossFit Boston.

What Should I Eat Before a Workout??

 

Deciding what to eat day-to-day can be challenging. Choosing the best thing to eat – a meal that will give you energy to perform without making you feel too full, sick, or hungry – can be even more challenging. Every workout is different, so how you fuel for each one will be different too. You probably wouldn’t eat the same breakfast before a 2K test as you would before a 10 mile run. Read on for some basic pre-workout meal guidelines and some ideas for before a workout.

 

..Read The Rest Here…

 

Then share your favorite pre-workout meal in the comments!