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25 Mar 2014

An Acquittal for Saturated Fat

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4931201391_6c72177b4f_zGrowing up I learned that fat was bad. Butter, beef, nuts, avocado – all “fattening” (seriously, we never had guacamole in my house growing up for this very reason). Lean meat lean beef lean lean lean has been drilled into us for the past thirty or so years. Even the American Heart Association – trusted resource for all things heart disease – recommends limiting saturated fat to just 5% of daily intake If you eat a 2,000 calorie diet, that leaves you with about 11 grams or  less than a tablespoon of coconut oil per day. (Although as a side note I somewhat question AHA’s wisdom after learning they endorsed Subway as a healthy meal option. But I digress.) Heck, I even learned it in college, and told I don’t know how many patients while I was working in the hospital to “choose lean meats and avoid foods high in saturated fat”. There has been questioning of this saturated fat-heart disease link recently, with a lot of it coming from the Paleo camp (Robb Wolf, etc).

 

Now, a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has cleared saturated fat of its charges. The review looked at 21 studies of over 347,000 people with follow up anywhere from 5-23 years. The results found no association between saturated fat intake and coronary heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular disease. Basically, there is no evidence to conclude that saturated fat is the devil incarnate.

 

What Does This Mean?

 

My general rule about saturated fat remains unchanged (and is essentially supported) by this study. Don’t be afraid of sat fat – there are a lot of food containing saturated fat that provide nutrients we need. Beef for example, is a good source of iron (which is needed to produce hemoglobin, a part of red cells that shuttles oxygen through the body. Not getting enough iron can result in anemia) and zinc (important for wound healing and immune health). But, most if not all of your saturated fat should still come from healthy, whole food sources – meat, milk, eggs, butter, etc and not from fried/processed foods or high sugar foods (like ice cream). Just as with carbohydrates, it’s not about the nutrient itself, it’s about where it comes from and the quality of that source.

 

The Bottom Line

 

Don’t be afraid of saturated fat. Just get it from the right place.

 

Source – American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Image c/o Chris Lindsay

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FIRE IT UP with CUSTOM FIT MEALS!

There is a ton of great things happening right now. Allow me to start with announcing we have partnered up with Custom Fit Meals. Here is their pledge:

CFM prepares and delivers fresh, delicious meals made from only the highest quality ingredients.  We specialize in producing Paleo, Primal and clean meals that fit our Nutritional Philosophy.

We use only USDA-certified All Natural, hormone- and antibiotic-free meats.  Our beef is grass-fed Angus, our poultry is cage-free, our pork is pastured, and our produce is sourced locally and organic as often as possible.  We only partner with ranchers that treat their animals humanely and feed them correctly.

Our unmatched variety of meal selections allows you to personalize your menu to fit your lifestyle.  This gives you the convenience you want, the portion control you need, and the quality of ingredients you deserve – all at an affordable price.

CFM GUARANTEE = Quality, Variety & Service + Prices you can Afford

The relationship between CFB and CFM does require a minimum commitment of 10 members. I have tried a couple of the meals and it was very good. The food had a ton of flavor and the portion was very satisfying. If you are someone that has a very busy schedule or if you find it difficult to make the correct choices, Custom Fit Meals will be perfect for you!

Here is how it works.

CrossFit Games Open 14.4 – The Chipper

Week 4 of the Open is here. The muscle up has finally made it appearance. More appropriately for the majority of CFB members, so has Toe 2 Bars. Dave Castro threw us a curveball with adding the rower to the Open for the very first time in history. I LOVE IT!

As has been the case with every Open workout, pacing will play a critical role. How you feel coming off the rower is going to be more important for those that are still struggling with T2B. Most of you will be able to complete 60 calories within 3 minutes and be ok going into the T2B. Today while warming up be sure to feel the pace of the rower and work on transitioning over to the pull up rig. For the T2B really try to focus on that hollow body position and sub maximal efforts. The more you work towards an effort that results in slipping off the bar, the harder it will be to recover the grip strength.

Moving on to the wall ball, attempt to complete the 40 reps in 1-3 sets. Pacing so you can breathe is critical. Your grip will get a much needed break from the first two movements but your legs are going to be tired. Be sure to be accurate and not miss reps b/c you were too fast and out of control.

Cleans for 30 reps. This is it for the majority of you reading this. Set your back, drive through your heels and try to minimize the rest time between reps. If you still have the energy to perform touch and go reps, you will fare better than if you have to perform a quick rep and drop the bar. The fewer sets the better. To hook grip or not to hook grip? I think this will depend on how efficient you are with the clean. If you are a repeat offender of using your arms, then try to use a hook grip to allow a loose but secure grip. If 135 is not a heavy weight and you can keep a loose grip and not pull with the arms on the clean, then give it a go without the hook grip.

Muscle Ups. If you are lucky enough to get this far and you have the ability to perform muscle ups, be sure to have that kip swing dialed in so the arms have as little action in the movement. Return back to the bottom of the dip and “fall” back into the kip swing to load the hip.

GOOD LUCK!!

Programming

With the exception of Carla B (GO CARLA GO!!) the rest of us understand the CrossFit Games season will end for us with 14.5. Because of this, the programming is going to begin our strength phase of training.

There will be a renewed focus on improving strength across the board for all members while still focusing on skill development in areas still lacking across the gym. There will still be a heavy emphasis on met cons as that is the base of what is CrossFit but you will begin seeing shorter and heavier WODS programmed in addition to the classic style of programming that has been emphasized the last couple of months.

WHAT’S ON TAP

Saturday 3/22

1. Push Press – 7×2
Work up to a heavy set of 2 then back off to 90% of that weight and perform 6 more sets.

2. AMRAP 8
10 OH swings, 32kg/24kg
10 Pull ups
5 Front squat, 185/125

Sunday 3/23

1. Run 1 mile (Test)

rest 10 minutes

2. 3 rounds for time
20 DB Split Cleans, 55/35
15 Knee to elbows
10 HR push ups

Monday 3/24

1. Back Squat – 5×3
work up to a heavy set of three and then back off to 90% of that and perform 4 more sets of 3

2. 21-15-9
Calories on the rower
Power Snatch, 135/95

Tuesday 3/25

1. 400m Medball Run – TEST

2. Hand balancing & Hollow body- spend 10 minutes practicing hand balancing and accumulate 100 Hollow rocks

3. AMRAP 5
10 Burpee Box Jumps, 24″/20″
10 Push Jerks, 155/110

rest 3 minutes

AMRAP 5
10 Power Clean, 155/110
10 CTB Pull ups

Wednesday 3/26

1. Bench Press – work up to a heavy set of 5 (not a max)

2. 5 rounds for time
15 OH squats, 115/75
15 Toe 2 bar

Thursday 3/27

1. Deadlift – 3 x 5 work up to a heavy set of 5. Drop down to 90% of that weight and then perform 3 more sets at that weight.

2. “1/2 Mary” – AMRAP10
5 Handstand push ups
10 Pistols (alternating legs each rep)
15 Pull ups

12 Mar 2014

Paleo Pro’s and Cons

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Sorry for the late blog post! I’ve seen lots of new faces in the gym over the past few months, so I am reposting my go-to article on the good and bad aspects of the paleo diet, and some recommendations for using it to improve your diet for anyone who’s heard of the paleo diet during their intro sessions but still wants more information (or for anyone who wants a refresher). Also, I’m a little short on time as I’m in California for work (you feel so sorry for me, right?).

 

The Paleo diet –  also known as the “caveman diet” – is a way of eating inspired by the diet of our Paleolithic ancestors, the men and women who lived 2.5 million years ago, before the agricultural revolution began about 10,000 years ago and provided mankind with a steady supply of grains, corn, dairy, and domestic meat. The theory behind Paleo eating is that our bodies are genetically programmed to eat certain foods, and that many modern health problems like obesity result from the introduction of grains, dairy, and other processed foods, which wreak havoc on our metabolic systems. The diet, and it’s “allowed” and “restricted” foods, are based on anthropological research providing insight into what pre-agricultural humans ate.

 

Foods allowed on a strict Paleolithic diet include lean meats and seafood, eggs, fruits and non-starchy vegetables, nuts (except peanuts), seeds, and plant-based oils such as olive, coconut, avocado, walnut, or grapeseed. Restricted foods include processed meats (like salami), dairy, grains such as rice, pasta, wheat, and corn, starchy vegetables like potatoes, soy products, legumes like beans and peanuts, alcohol, and refined sugar.  Following a Paleo diet does not require minding of portion sizes or food measurement. The recommendation is to eat Paleo approved foods when you are hungry and stop when you are full. The idea is that it’s fairly hard to eat too many calories when they are coming from protein sources and high fiber, filling sides like vegetables, fruits, or healthy fats. The Paleo diet can be followed strictly or modified to meet your individual needs. For instance, some follow an “80/20” rule, eating Paleo about 80% of the time and allowing room for leniency with other foods or cheat days. Others follow a strict Paleo diet but include dairy, butter, or both.

 

 

The Research on the Paleo diet, while promising, is fairly limited. Several small studies have shown a Paleolithic diet may help improve markers of health in both healthy people and those with chronic disease. For example, one study showed that a Paleolithic diet resulted in lower mean glycated hemoglobin (a measure of blood sugar control over time) values, diastolic blood pressure, and waist circumference, and higher HDL cholesterol (the “good” cholesterol) when compared to a standard diabetes diet. Among healthy adults, a small metabolically controlled study (meaning what participants ate was strictly controlled) found improvements in blood pressure, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and cholesterol without weight loss over a 10-day period.

 

In addition, while the evidence for the Paleo diet specifically, especially in athletes, is not prolific, research has shown high-protein, low-carbohydrate type diets to be effective for fat loss in a number of studies. Recently, a study appearing in Nutrition & Metabolismfound that Paleo dieters not only felt more satisfied in terms of appetite, but also had lower levels of circulating leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite, food consumption, and body fat storage.

 

Why Eating Paleo is Awesome…

 

  • It eliminates the crap – eating whole foods and avoiding food products with refined sugars, preservatives, harmful additives, high levels of sodium, and added fats has numerous benefits in terms of weight management, health, and athletic performance.
  • More vitamins and minerals – because you eat more fruits and veggies on a Paleo diet, you are getting much more fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants than on a typical Western Diet. Vitamins can help, but 90% of the nutrients in a typical multivitamin tablet are not absorbed but are excreted (meaning you pee them out). Studies have shown that eating more fruits and vegetables reduces cancer risk, but when researchers attempted to isolate and supplement specific vitamins common in produce, the effect wasn’t replicated.
  • Less “bad” fat and more “good” fat – the Paleo diet typically consists of more omega-3 and unsaturated fats via increased intake of foods like almonds, walnuts, and avocados and reduction in saturated fats by eliminating high fat meats and processed foods like chips and desserts. Unsaturated fats may reduce inflammation, which is good for everyone, especially athletes.
  • Health Benefits – although the research is limited, the Paleo diet has been associated with greater weight loss success, greater satiety, and improvements in markers of chronic disease. There are numerous anecdotes of people having found success eating this way.

 

Why it’s not so awesome...

 

  • It takes more planning – it’s easy to get enough carbohydrates and calcium on a standard American diet. It’s also easy to grab lunch at the office if you forgot to pack it. So while it’s possible to meet all your nutritional needs on a Paleo diet while enjoying good food, it requires more planning and, often times, ahead of time meal preparation. If you’re not used to packing your lunch or cooking nearly all of your meals, it will take an adjustment.
  • $$$ – I don’t subscribe to the belief that it is more expensive to eat a healthy diet, but following a strict Paleo diet will up your grocery bill, at least a little bit, due to increased purchasing of meat and vegetables. This increase will be greater if you switch completely to organic and grass-fed products. On the flip side, if you give up junk food and soda and eat out less, this will probably even out.
  • Does it make sense? – Dr. Cordain argues that our bodies are genetically adapted to a Paleo diet, and the influence of grains and processed foods has led to our current health problems. But people started eating bread 10,000 years ago, and the epidemic of obesity and chronic disease is at best a 30 year old problem. So is bread and dairy the devil? Or is an increasingly sedentary lifestyle combined with more people eating out more often and ever growing portion sizes the real culprit?
  • Carbohydrates – for most people the moderate carbohydrate levels in a Paleo diet are enough to support normal functioning and maintain glucose and glycogen stores. However, people with higher carbohydrate needs, like endurance athletes, or rowers doing multiple workouts per day, may have a hard time meeting them on a Paleo diet.The Paleo Diet for Athletes, written by Dr. Cordain and endurance coach Joe Friel, actually recommends following a Paleo diet for most of the time while supplementing other foods, such as sports drinks, around workouts to get adequate carbohydrates.
  • Difficulty – A US News Report rated the Paleo diet one of the worst diets for 2011 and difficulty was a factor. For some people, eliminating 3 major food categories (grains, dairy, legumes) may just be too much to stick with over an extended period. Going on a drastic diet that you won’t be able to maintain could result in frustration, stress, and ultimately giving up and just “eating whatever” for a while, which will be a weight loss and/or goal setback and just leads to more stress.

 

So what should you do?

 

As far as I’m concerned, there is no “perfect diet” for all people. That being said, I think there is merit to the principles behind the Paleo diet and at the very least I would consider it a good framework for building a healthy, maintainable diet. Ideally, you do want to eliminate processed foods (like Spam, Cheetos, fast food, etc) and focus on more “Paleo foods” like meat, vegetables, fruit, nuts, seeds, and oils. However having the occasional whole grain (that’s wheat bread, brown rice, whole wheat pasta, oatmeal etc), dairy product, or legume isn’t going to kill you (unless you have a food allergy).

 

Here are some good guidelines to follow:

  • Load up on lean meats, veggies, and fruits first. They contain those essential nutrients like protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.
  • Eat a healthy diet that works for you and doesn’t drive you nuts. You want to follow a healthful nutrition plan, but you don’t want to set yourself up for failure either.
  • Avoid processed crap. It’s that simple. If the ingredients list is longer than your entire grocery list and you find yourself trying to decide if it’s healthy, just put it back on the shelf. It’s probably not that great for you.
  • Avoid added sugars and sodium. That includes canned stuff, “pre-made” meals, sugary beverages, junk snacks, and many breakfast cereals.
  • Limit the booze. It’s empty calories and makes you feel not awesome the next day, which can increase cravings for less healthy foods and limit your desire and/or ability to work out.
  • Disregard all of the above and have a cheat day every now and then. It can be good for you. Check out why here.
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Yes, the title is sarcasm. But these are real…

 

Screen Shot 2014-03-04 at 10.01.03 PMFrom TMZ: “High protein diets ‘nearly as bad as smoking'” 

From LiveScience: “High protein diets raise cancer risk as much as smoking” 

From the LA Times: “High protein diets: bad in middle age, good for the elderly”

 

Let me start out by saying that I’m not going to tell you to eat less animal protein. But I saw this headline earlier and felt like having a rant.

 

I read the Washington Post iteration of this story first but couldn’t find the study cited. I then searched in Google News and found 66 articles. I read 10 of them, and none cited the actual source of the article. I also searched on PubMed but lost my patience after a page or two. So I haven’t actually read the original study or abstract, just the mainstream media reports.

 

What We Know

 

The study followed 6,000 people over age 50 for 18 years and found that people age 50-65 who ate a “high protein diet” (over 20% of calories from protein) were almost 4 times more likely to die of cancer during the 18 year study period than people who ate a low protein diet (less than 10% of calories from protein). The link between cancer and protein was only noted in people whose diets were high in animal protein (milk, eggs, cheese, and meat), but people whose protein was mostly from plant sources were not at high risk. On the other hand, people over 65 were less likely to die of cancer if they ate more protein. The higher protein diet in that age group was thought to be beneficial because it helped older participants maintain a healthy weight and avoid frailty. 

 

There was a concurrent study in mice looking at IGF-1 (a growth factor) and showing that the higher protein diet promoted tumor growth by increasing the IGF-1. The researchers also measured IGF-1 in 2,000 of the study participants and found that increasing IGF-1 levels were linked to increasing risk of cancer death. 

 

A Few Thoughts

 

  1. What kind of “animal protein” were participants eating? Was it grass-fed steak and grilled chicken? Or was it dollar value hamburgers and fried chicken?
  2. Was there any health bias? Comparing vegetarians to meat eaters can be tricky, because vegetarians have already made a conscious effort to do something healthy, whereas “everyone else who eats meat” may not have. A better comparison might be comparing vegetarians to people who are following a healthy diet that includes meat.
  3. Did they account for physical activity and other health behaviors? Often the health bias works both ways – people who make one choice in the name of health improvement tend to make others (like exercising, not smoking, etc). It’s likely they did, as most studies do now, but worth asking. 

 

It’s also important to remember that this is a long term, cohort study. These types of studies are good for identifying associations, but they can’t prove cause and effect. 

 

So What’s The Point?

 

Don’t listen to mainstream news when you want nutrition information. Keep eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, healthy protein and fat, avoiding processed crap and staying active. And join me in praying for a study that FINALLY compares plant based diets to healthier diets that include animal proteins. Until then, pass the bison burger…

25 Feb 2014

Eat To Compete

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tumblr_mzwvmiCFBe1rkembbo1_1280As the open approaches, many of us are entering competitor mode. I’m sure Neal and the other coaches will be telling us lots about mobility and recovery, so I’m just going to talk about food. How you eat can seriously impact how you perform. Read on for a few nutrition tips to help you perform your best during the Open.

 

Before The WODs

 

Before a workout, your body should have a topped off fuel tank. This means you should have enough glycogen (the body’s stored form of carbohydrate) stored as well as some more readily available from food. In general, pre workout meals or snacks should be:

  • Enough energy to prepare you for the workout without leaving you hungry or with undigested food in your stomach
  • Low in fiber and fat
  • Higher in carbohydrates
  • Moderate in protein

Meals low in fat and fiber will allow your stomach to empty in time so you can avoid stomach discomfort. The carbohydrates will top off glycogen stores (which is important, since the body relies on glycogen rather than fat stores for energy during shorter CrossFit WODs), maintain blood sugar levels, and provide energy.  Protein will help you avoid hunger. In addition, it is important to be hydrated before exercise. The recommendation is that athletes drink 2-3 milliliters of water per pound of body weight at least 4 hours before working out to hydrate and get rid of any excess fluid (Rodriguez et al 2009).

 

After The WODs

 

IMG_0757Post Workout/Recovery is the most important time, as it is the time when your body reaps the benefits of all the hard work you’ve done. During the workout your body burns through your stored glycogen, you lose fluid to sweating, and muscle tissue is broken down. Recovery is when you can replenish your stored glycogen, replace lost fluid, and rebuild damaged muscles.

 

We used to think the precise timing of recovery was very important, advising that within one hour of a workout you had to have 30-60 grams of carbohydrate and15-20 grams of protein because this was during the time your metabolism was most active. The consensus was that eating right after the workout improved muscle strength and hypertrophy. However now we know that eating within this window is less important than previously thought (Schoenfeld et al). So, as long as you eat a good, nutrient rich (read: lots of vegetables and fruits) meal with protein and carbohydrates, and maintain an adequate calorie intake throughout the day, you will continue to build strength and fitness.

 

What To Eat

 

Try to eat something that not only provides these nutrients but also provides vitamins and minerals. Research has shown that chocolate milk may be a good recovery option because the milk provides calcium and magnesium, two minerals important in muscle contractions, and potassium, which is an important electrolyte lost in sweat. Other good options include a veggie omelet with fried plantain, sweet potato, or wheat toast and grilled steak with roasted vegetables. 

 

What’s your favorite post workout meal? 

 

Photo 1 c/o Public Health Memes

IMG_0757In response to our collective interest in eating healthier, food companies have started trying to make healthier products. Well, sort of. They are trying to make products that LOOK and FEEL healthier, though they may not be. Hence the emergence of things like veggie chips and other “natural products”. (As a side note, my biggest pet peeve these days is a bag of veggie chips proudly bragging “1 serving of vegetables in each portion”. Um, NO because fried potato and corn with some salt is not a serving of vegetables! But I digress).

 

What does the natural label mean?

 

natural_cheetosNothing. Squat. The “All Natural” and “Natural” labels on food are not regulated by the FDA or any other organization. Which means unlike labels like Organic and Low Fat, a food sporting Natural claim doesn’t have to meet any type of requirements. If not for worry of public backlash (or lawsuit), M&Ms and Coca Cola could use a Natural label on their soda and candy, too. The good news is, people are starting to recognize this (or at least lawyers are). Last year Naked Juice lost a class action lawsuit claiming that their use of the Natural and All Natural claims, despite the juices containing non-natural things like GMO soy. 

 

How do you know what’s really natural?

 

Look at the ingredients label. If it contains something that don’t sound like they occur immediately in nature (like soy lecithin, GMO products, corn starch, etc), avoid it. And of course, use common sense. Something can claim it’s natural, and contain all ingredients that are, but that doesn’t make it natural. Just like frying some potatoes does not a vegetable serving make (although I can’t make the same argument for home made kale chips).

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photoAs many of you have noticed (and lamented), sleep is a big part of the Transformation Challenge. But sleep doesn’t just impact how hard it is to get out of bed or how much coffee you need to survive the day, it can also affect your food choices, sports performance, and long term health. 

 

Sleep occurs in two parts, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. NREM sleep makes up about 75% of sleep time and consists of four stages. Stages 1 and 2 are the beginnings of sleep, when your start breathing more irregularly and begin to disengage from your surroundings. Stages 3 and 4 are the parts of the sleep cycle where the most recovery occurs, as breathing slows, tissues are repaired, energy is restored, and important hormones are released. REM sleep makes up the other 25% of sleep time, usually happening 90 minutes after you fall asleep and recurring every 90 minutes. During REM sleep, energy is provided to the brain and body, the brain is active – this is the part of sleep where dreaming happens – while the body becomes immobile as muscles are turned off.

Read More

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First things first, housekeeping: this Saturday there will be no nutrition session due to the Average Joe’s competition. The session will be held on Friday, January 17th or on Monday, January 20th in the evening. Please comment or email me with your preference!

 

berry-pancakesCarbs. Everyone generally interested in nutrition and healthy eating seems to be talking about carbs these days. But before I tell you all about them, I must address one of my biggest pet peeves and one of the biggest myth that seems to be floating around – the idea that you can “give up carbs”. Let me just say definitively that you cannot. Why? Because they are in everything that is good for you. Fruits. Vegetables. Even whole dairy. Because, you see, “carbs” are not pasta, rice, and baked goods. “Carbs” is really just an abbreviation for carbohydrates – the body’s main source of energy. So, you can give up grains. You can give up starchy carbohydrates. But you can’t really give up ALL carbohydrates. Allow me to explain further…

 

What are carbohydrates?

 

Carbohydrates are molecules made up of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, and can be found in simple or complex structures. They provide fuel and are the body’s most readily available source of energy. 

 

Why do you need them?

 

1270914_10104168540393451_1482221392_oWhen you eat carbohydrates, the body breaks them down into the simple sugar glucose, which is then transported throughout the body to provide energy, fuel important reactions, and maintain blood sugar levels. Any glucose not used immediately is stored in your liver as glycogen. During quick bouts of exercise, like a 100 meter sprint, the body uses glucose as the main source of fuel. But when it needs additional energy during longer workouts, it will draw on its glycogen stores, as well as stored fat, for energy. Having enough glycogen stored up for the body to use will allow you to perform at your best, both in competition and training. On the other hand, not getting enough carbohydrates and energy to meet your needs over an extended period of time can weaken your immune system – meaning you could get sick more often – and make you feel less energetic.

 

Where do you find them?

 

photo 3Carbohydrates come from a variety of sources, and some are better than others. Some of the better sources of carbohydrates include fruits and vegetables, starches like sweet potato, and some whole grains (quinoa, oats, barley). Fruits and vegetables are the best sources of carbohydrates because they have more fiber and other nutrients like vitamins and minerals (that occur naturally, not through fortification) and are less energy dense. Which carbohydrates you choose will depend on your goals (I’ll get to that in a minute).

 

 The carbohydrates to avoid include baked goods, simple sugars (like table sugar and syrups), processed grains (or “white” grains), and other processed snack foods.

 

How many should you be eating?

 

392034_2510639963358_1858750564_nHow much carbohydrate you need depends on the intensity and volume of training, gender, and type of sport. Research indicates that elite (college and professional) athletes need 6-12 grams of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight (weight in kilograms = weight in pounds divided by 2.2). Women and less active athletes will be on the lower end of that range, while men or endurance athletes will be on the higher end. However, most recreational athletes  will need fewer carbohydrates, as they are not training over 2 hours per day as those athletes do. For most people I recommend 3-6 grams/kg of body weight, depending on your training. For example, a runner who does CrossFit twice a week and is trying to maintain weight will want to eat more carbohydrates than someone who does CrossFit four times a week and is trying to lose weight. 

 

The thing about carbohydrates is there is not enough evidence to recommend exact levels to everyone. How much you need depends on your training, weight, and goals, but also on your subjective feelings. Two people might eat the same proportion of carbohydrates, and while one person feels fantastic, the other feels low energy and lethargic. All things considered, if you can’t focus at work you likely need to eat more carbohydrates. 

 

Should You Be Giving Up Grains?

 

During the Transformation Challenge, a lot of us are giving up grains for 6 weeks. But after the challenge, how should you deal with reintroducing them? Or should you at all? Here are a few tips:

  • Keep your weight goals in mind. If you’re trying to lose weight, keeping grains mostly out of your diet  – while allowing yourself greater liberation in other areas – is a good way to cut out unnecessary calories. If you’re trying to gain weight (or have trouble maintaining it), it is much harder to get enough calories and carbohydrates without grains. It’s possible, but far more difficult (and expensive). 

 

  • Keep your fitness goals in mind: Endurance sports will require more carbohydrates than anaerobic sports (like CrossFit). 

 

  • Keep the grains healthy. Even if you do add back in grains, don’t add in the Eggo waffles, Oreos, and white grains. Add back in bread with only a few ingredients in it (less than 5),brown rice, oats, barley, etc.

 

We can talk more about carbs in this week’s nutrition session. Free for anyone who bought (or buys – there’s still time!) my transformation challenge package and $15 to drop in.

1292854_10104168503357671_368462039_o You’re going to eat restaurant or convenience food sometime over the next six weeks. You just are. I mean, maybe you are a freak of nature who is ALWAYS prepared and never feels like socializing. Power to you. But most people are going to run into work lunches, dinner with the girls, happy hour, pure laziness, or some other similar non-ideal situations. And while it’s not always easy, there are strategies for sticking to your diet while you eat out.

 

1. Do some research ahead of time.

 

1601546_10104604919720781_2037852626_nThis will be especially helpful if you’re in a situation like a work lunch, where you don’t want to be this guy who orders your meal like Sally orders dinner in When Harry Met Sally. So look at the menu ahead of time. If you’re just grabbing Panera for lunch, it’s easy to look online for the nutrition facts and ingredients for every food. If it’s a nicer place, the menu likely won’t list all ingredients but they’ll generally indicate what’s in the sauce. If you have a few good options identified, you won’t have to study the menu intensely for the right option once you’re there. If you’re really dedicated, you can probably even call ahead and inquire about anything that concerns you.

 

2. Stick to the basics.

 

Meat. Vegetables. Oil and vinaigrette. You  can usually get a basic steak or fish and side of vegetables or basic salad at at most places.

 

3. Don’t go to Cracker Barrel (or any place like it).

 

Or any place like it. Look, while I”m of the firm belief you can make a good choice or a bad choice almost anywhere, I’m also fairly convinced (despite the guy who lost 37 pounds eating only McDonald’s) that some places just don’t offer anything worth buying. A few months ago Patrick and I were starving and driving through the middle of rural New Hampshire, so we stopped at Cracker Barrel. We figured it was better than Wendy’s, right? And I had pretty good memories of playing checkers when I was a kid. But the food was awful – processed, cheap, and not even appealing. Your sides of vegetables were maybe 1/3 cup while you got almost a whole plate of white pasta. My point being, even when you order the best thing on the menu there, it’s a far cry from a healthy meal. So avoid places like that as much as you can. Better places include Chipotle or Panera, where you can get a decent salad.

 

 

The Best Meal Ideas

 

  • If you’re at a fast food joint (Panera, Sebastian’s, Chipotle…) – go for the basic salad. Lettuce, meat, beans, veggies, avocado, etc.
  • If you’re at a nicer place – steak, fish, or chicken and a side of vegetables, sans any featured sauces. If you’re not on the transformation challenge but still trying to stay healthy, you can add a side of roasted potatoes if they have them.
  • If you’re at a sports bar – bun-less burger topped with lettuce, tomato, and onion, mustard, and avocado with a side of vegetables.
  • If you’re skiing/riding – chili. Almost every ski lodge has it,  and it’s usually mostly beans, meat, veggies, and tomato sauce. Yes that sauce might have sugar in it, but it might be the best non-salad item you can get there. I don’t know about you but salad doesn’t sound so good when I’m coming off the slopes freezing with ice down my back.

 

The Best Drink Ideas

 

RedWineTo be perfectly clear, none of the below booze-y beverages are transformation challenge compliant. But if you must have a drink (no judgement here, it is football season afterall…) these are going to be the best options.

 

 

  • If  you want to appear social but don’t feel like alcohol – seltzer water with lime. Because sometimes “why aren’t you drinking?” and “ugh you diet too much” get old. Order the soda water with lime and you can fly under the radar in social situations without playing paleo 20 questions.
  • If you want the booze – red wine is the best choice here. Yeah, yeah, Rob Wolf says tequila is paleo. And I’m pretty sure that’s because he likes tequila and recognizes (correctly) that in our world abolishing all alcohol is unrealistic for most. But red wine is the one with science-demostrated heart health benefits, so I’d stick with the Merlot/Cabernet.

 

In short, if you do some research ahead of time and stick to basic meat and veggie dishes, you can absolutely enjoy a nice meal out with friends or a date without abandoning your diet. What’s your go-to paleo-approved restaurant meal?

 

REMINDER: I’ll be hosting a group meeting this Saturday 1/11/14 at 12 pm.  Free to anyone buying the transformation challenge nutrition package and $15 to drop in. Hope to see you there! Email me at [email protected] for more details.

5905454471_7e0ce0ef97_nFor most people, a jar of multivitamins on your countertop is a marker of a healthy person. Of course, I have always been convinced that you can get all the nutrients you need from food if you eat the right foods. Looks like science might be proving my point. An article yesterday from Science Daily reported on 2 articles published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, which found that taking a daily vitamin/mineral supplement really has no clear benefit for most healthy people.

 

What does this mean?

 

This means you don’t need to spend $17.99 a month for vitamins at CVS. It means vitamins and minerals do the most for your body when they come from food.

 

Where do I get my vitamins and minerals?

 

From food, duh. These foods in particular…

 

  • Vitamin A – orange and red colored vegetables like red and orange bell pepper, sweet potato, carrots, pumpkin, cantaloupe, apricots, tomatoes, etc as well as broccoli, ricotta cheese, and black eyed peas.

 

  • B Vitamins (riboflavin, niacin, etc) – green leafy vegetables, fortified grains (but the vegetables are a way better  option).

 

  • Vitamin B12 – animal products, including meat, dairy, and eggs.

 

  • Folate – beef liver, green vegetables including spinach, asparagus. brussel sprouts,and lettuce, and avocado.

 

  • Vitamin C – strawberries, citrus fruits, kiwi, broccoli, brussel sprouts

 

  • Vitamin D – fatty fish like swordfish, salmon, and tuna, fortified OJ, fortified milk, sardines, and egg (found in the yolk).

 

  • Vitamin E – sunflower seeds, almond, peanut butter, safflower oil, and boiled spinach and broccoli.

 

  • Vitamin K – green leafy vegetables; the darker the vegetable, the more vitamin K.

 

  • Iron – red meat, dark green leafy vegetables like spinach and kale,

 

When Should I take a vitamin/mineral supplement?

 

This study found that in healthy people, daily vitamin and mineral supplements aren’t really necessary. However, it IS a good idea to take a vitamin or mineral supplement in some cases. Some of these include:

  • If you have a vitamin deficiency. If the deficiency is low enough, you may be able to correct it by taking a multivitamin that includes that nutrient. If you are very deficient in a vitamin, your doctor may recommend more aggressive supplementation (for example, if you have severe iron deficiency anemia). Of course, while you are correcting the deficiency with a supplement, you will also want to increase your intake of foods high in that nutrient so you don’t become deficient again later on.

 

  • If you are at high risk for vitamin deficiency. Vegans – and sometimes vegetarians – need to supplement B12, because it is only found in animal products, while female athletes are at a higher risk for iron deficiency and northerners (that’s us!) are at high risk of vitamin D deficiency during the winter months due to minimal sunlight exposure.

 

  • If you are pregnant. Since research has very clearly demonstrated the benefits of folate for preventing spina bifida and other neurological disorders in newborns, mothers are encouraged to take folate while they are pregnant.

 

If you’d like to read more for yourself, here’s the article from Science Daily.

 

What are your thoughts on multivitamin/mineral supplements?

 

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