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16 Apr 2014

It’s OK To Be Sally

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2401995347_e23469cd13_qIn case you haven’t seen the epic pie order in When Harry Met Sally, watch now for context. While I don’t advise ordering complicated desserts as a great way to stick to a clean diet, I’ve got a point to make.  

When I say “it’s OK to be Sally”, I mean that it’s OK to be a huge, pain in the butt when you order at a restaurant. Go ahead, be all “Can you please cook my vegetables in olive oil or steamed instead of in butter, unless the butter happens to be grass-fed” and all “Do you have any BBQ sauce made with just molasses and honey, with no cane sugar or corn syrup?”, and “can you grill that instead of frying it, please?”. It’s OK to complain when you ask for a side of vegetables instead of some other processed carbohydrate and receive a quarter cup of sad looking veggies smothered in butter/oil. 

 

It’s OK for you to ask the Butcher or Fish Peddler to cut your meat to just the right amount. It’s OK to ask for grass fed beef or bison, and if they don’t have it ask them to go check or maybe even order some. It’s OK to ask for wild caught salmon and decide to go elsewhere if they don’t have it.

 

It’s OK to be honest with your friends and coworkers about what you eat. If someone is grilling Bubba Burgers, it’s OK for you to ask them to throw on a piece of chicken or bison for you. Hell, vegetarians do it all the time with their Kween-o burgers (see this ad if you don’t get the joke). It’s OK to ask that your coworkers don’t get you cupcakes on your birthday because you’re trying to avoid sugar. It’s OK to ask for the gluten free option at catered work lunches (although be advised, this isn’t always healthier per se). 

 

I know this is a fine line. It is obviously not OK to go to your friends house for dinner and look upon the white rice, rolls, or cheese platter and condescendingly inform them “I don’t eat that”. But I feel like we have spent too much time waiting on old fashioned economics of supply and demand to produce heather products, and the movement has been slow.  ’Cause the food industry is way behind. Remember how we thought egg yolks were bad for us from like the mid 1980′s until the end of the 1990′s? Want to guess when McDonalds came out with an egg white option? THIS YEAR. While we appreciate your effort guys, it’s not the yolk we have a problem with, and we haven’t for over fifteen years. Other companies are better at picking up on trends, but not necessarily to our benefit. I mean, thanks for the gluten free wanter, peanuts, and yogurt I guess… And shout out to Dunkin Donuts for the turkey sausage and turkey bacon offerings, which are really not any healthier for you than regular bacon and taste way worse.

 

So my point is this: If you want a healthier, better food product, ask for it. Loudly and often. Because right now the food industry is making lots of money based on the assumption (and their efforts to keep it so) that everyone just can’t get enough soda, snacks, and processed convenience dinners. That we don’t care what’s in the food as long as it sounds “healthy” or is low calorie/low carb/low fat, etc. If we want better food, we have to demand it. And nothing speaks louder with food industry than your wallet. 

 

What do you think about this?

 

Photo 1

** A little context on the Flickr donut: when I searched “demanding” on flickr for a nice illustrative image, I stumbled upon a protest demanding Flickr give out free donuts. I think this makes asking for better food sound a little less ridiculous. I was also greatly amused, thus explaining the inclusion of this image.

 

 

I was planning on starting a weekly member blog, but had no idea my first blog would be describing an experience with the infamous Rhabdomyolysis. I’m sure everyone is somewhat familiar with Rhabdo. Fortunately it is rare enough that it doesn’t happen often. However, most people know of someone, or a friend of a friend who finds themselves at the mercy of Rhabdo.

 

I am trying to piece together what made last week different and why the conditioning or my behavior outside of CFB could have contributed to the onset of Rhabdo. So far I only have a few ideas.

 

I CrossFit about 4 to 5 days a week, and last week I completed WODS Monday- Thursday. My quads were tight, and sore but nothing that seemed out of the norm. On Friday I was planning on doing the 4:30 WOD, and I was foam rolling and stretching which is something I am adamant about doing before every class.

 

As I went to get up from mobility, I felt a sharp pain down my left quad and quickly sat back down, feeling light headed, and weak, I thought I had pulled a muscle and decided against working out that afternoon instead opting for continuing mobility. I went home iced my leg, took Tylenol and continued on with my Friday.

 

I awoke on Saturday experiencing the same pain and I was having a hard time putting any weight on my leg. I posted on the CFB BS board asking for advice and immediately members mentioned Rhabdo. I started Web- Mding, which is not advised, but I was experiencing some of the symptoms. My leg was tender to touch, swollen, and feeling warm.

 

With a lot of encouragement from the CFB community, I decided Sunday it was time to head to the ER. I was lucky because Krista picked me up, and she was working in the ER at Brigham and I received the VIP treatment.

 

At first the nurses didn’t think it was Rhabdo, because I was not acting like a Rhabdo patient. After multiple people looked at my leg, noticing the swelling, redness, bruising, and warmth they concluded it probably was more than a simple strain. They were concerned with Rhabdo as well as compartment syndrome, which was an even more terrifying possibility. I was started on fluids while my blood was sent to the lab for tests. After a couple of hours it was confirmed that my CK levels were elevated and I indeed had Rhabdo. I had caught the Rhabdo early enough so my course of treatment was simply fluids and rest; fortunately there is no apparent kidney damage. I was discharged in the morning with instructions to continue hydrating, resting and no crossfitting for a couple of weeks. As far as what caused it, its possible I was not drinking enough water throughout the week or I simply just over did it, I will never really know. I probably was experiencing Rhabdo for a few days and Friday when my muscles were in a vulnerable state any amount of strain was just too much. I am still feeling pretty weak, and sore but I am definitely on the mend!

 

My take away from this whole experience is positive. I am thankful for the CrossFit community in that they are informed of the symptoms and their insistence that I went to the ER. I think if anyone ever feels even slightly concerned that they could be experiencing Rhabdo they should head to the doctor. It is not something you want to mess around with, but if caught early the treatment is rather simple. In the end I think this experience will make me a more cautious, and aware Crossfitter and hopefully down the road a knowledgeable CrossFit coach!

Who’s ready for the Town Hall Meeting tomorrow at 6:30pm?Bob and Coach Pat at CRASH-B 2014

 

Just wanted to give a quick shout out to new member Bob E. for making the CRI Comp Team!  Bob has been working hard all winter and has been loving every class at CrossFit Boston.  You’ll usually catch him at 6am or 7am on Tuesday and Thursday, because he is now officially rowing on the Men’s Comp. Team at CRI on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.  Keep up the awesome work Bob and represent!

 

A big thing that Bob has learned and started to focus on to make improvements in his rowing and lifting is mobility!  If you’re in need of more mobility knowledge and practice, come join us for Mobility Wednesdays every week at 6:30pm.  Kapil took everyone through hamstring mobility for deadlifts yesterday.  Who’s joining us next week?

 

 

RR Workshop at NAVSTA NewportLast but not least, I wanted to share some pictures from the Rowing Workshop that I put on for the Newport Naval Base yesterday.  You didn’t see me in the gym because I traveled down to Newport, RI to host a Renegade Rowing Workshop for members of the NAVSTA Newport Gym.  We had a blast learning to squat, row, and race with a Partner 2k Relay.  If you’re interested in rowing on the water with the Renegade Rowing Team - sign up here and shoot me an email – [email protected]

 

See you in the Gym!

Coach PatRR Workshop at Newport Navy Base

09 Apr 2014

R.I.C.E.?

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Many of us here have been an athlete at some point in our lives even if we don’t consider ourselves “athletes” (you are, you just need to find your inner “athlete”). Anywho, before I get off on a tangent, we have all heard the acronym R.I.C.E. in reference to an injury. It has become “common-knowledge” that for an athletic injury we employ Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation to help alleviate soreness and pain.

But the very same physician who coined the term R.I.C.E. has come out saying that Ice and complete Rest might not be the answer to helping us heal faster.  

Read on here for more on this… 

04 Apr 2014

FIRE IT UP! April 4, 2014

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FIRE IT UP! FIRE IT UP!

The Open is complete! Everyone gave great efforts and as coaches we saw some significant improvements across the board. Congrats to everyone that participated.

Carla B has qualified, still awaiting the official announcement, for the NorthEast Regionals as an individual competitor. She finished 32nd in the Region. Get ready to head down to Canton, MA on May 30-June 1 at the Reebok World Headquarters to cheer her on!

Carla rocking out 14.5.

Carla rocking out 14.5.

HONORING BFD

Beginning this weekend we will have a collection jar for donations for the family of recently fallen Lt. Ed Walsh of the BFD. Lt. Walsh left behind a wife with 3 children under the age of 10 when he and FF Kennedy perished in the 9 Alarm Fire in Back Bay last week.

Tomorrow’s 11am class will perform the Hero WOD Mike “Dork” Kennedy:

For time
33 Back Squat, 225/155
15 Burpees
33 Deadlift, 225/155
15 Burpees
33 OH Swings, 32kg/24kg
15 Burpees

FF Kennedy was a member of the CrossFit community and had trained/coached at CrossFit Craic, CrossFit Together, and CrossFit Florian.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Friday 4/11 – Town Hall Meeting – 6:30pm at the GYM

Sat/Sun 4/19-4/20 – CrossFit Level 1 Seminar Gym Closed (Meet at Harvard Track)

Monday – 4/21 Patriots Day – Marathon Monday (1 WOD at the gym and then Potluck after)

Saturday 4/26 – Hydrostatic Weighing with Metro Fitness Wave

TOWN HALL MEETING
Join us at the gym next Friday at 6:30pm. The staff and I will be on hand to breakdown the some of the changes that have occurred within the gym and the continued improvements and how exactly they will benefit you all as current members. It will be exciting to discuss so try to make it!

CROSSFIT LEVEL 1 CERTIFICATION
On Saturday 4/19 & Sunday 4/20 we are hosting a CrossFit Level 1 Cert. The gym will be closed so members should meet each morning over at the Harvard University Track for an outdoor workout. It will be FUN.

PATRIOT DAY – MARATHON MONDAY
Join us at the gym for 1 WOD at 10am and a potluck after. Food, drink, and good conversations. We will stream the marathon on the TV screens. Bring your favorite foods to share!

HYDROSTATIC WEIGHING
Keith from Metro Fitness Wave will be back here at CFB on Saturday 4/26 to perform hydrostatic measurements. If you missed out on the last round or you wish to retest, this will be your chance. Monday of next week we will have a link on the website to register, schedule, and pay for your spot. You can learn more about the service here.

PROGRAMMING

Saturday 4/5

1. Bench Press – work up to a 5RM for the day

2. 21-15-9 for time
Front Rack Lunges, 135/95
Ring Dips

11am ONLY – Hero WOD Mike “Dork” Kennedy:

For time
33 Back Squat, 225/155
15 Burpees
33 Deadlift, 225/155
15 Burpees
33 OH Swings, 32kg/24kg
15 Burpees

Sunday 4/6

1. Row 1k – TEST

2. With a Partner Complete AMRAP 20
5 Pull ups
10 Burpees
15 Deadlift, 225/155

Only one person working on the AMRAP at a time. The second person will be rowing for max distance on the rower. The partners switch when a full round is complete.

Score rounds + reps and total combined distance rowed by the team.

Monday 4/7

1. Push Press – work up to a 3RM for the day

2. 4 x 200m repeats
rest 2x the time it took to complete the sprint

3. Abs – Accumulate 100 total reps from the following movements: GHD sit ups, T2B, KTE, strict back extensions

Tuesday 4/8

1. “Zimmerman”
AMRAP 25
11 CTB Pull ups
2 Deadlift, 315/220
10 HSPU

2. 10 x 30 sec L-sit holds

Wednesday 4/9

1. Front Squat – work up to a 2RM

2. For time
75 Wallball shots
25 Double unders
50 Wallball shots
50 Double Unders
25 Wallball shots
75 Double Unders

3. Grip work

Thursday 4/10

1. EMOM 15 – 2 Power Snatch AHAP + 1 MU

2. AMRAP 5
15 OH Swings, 32kg/24kg
15 Burpees

rest 5 minutes

AMRAP 5
15 Burpees
15 Step ups, 20″

Friday 4/11

1. TEST 1 mile run

2. “Angie”
100 Pull ups
100 Push ups
100 Sit ups
100 Air squats

No, this is not a belated April Fool’s, although I am now kicking myself for not asking to blog a day early. I could have had a lot of fun with that one. 

There’s been a lot of hate going around in the media for high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and fructose. Some “nutritionists” may even tell you to cut back on fruit because fructose is so dangerous. But is this all true?

 

What We Know

hfcs obesity

 

We know in studies of mice, feeding them diets upwards of 40-50% of their diet from HFCS leads to development of cancer, obesity, and other side effects.  We can also see a graph (right) of  obesity rising significantly in the 30+ years after HFCS was introduced to the food supply in the 1970′s. Meanwhile other studies are finding there are no significant negative effects attributed to HFCS.

 Now, it’s become a fierce debate. One camp blasting the many ways HFCS will kill you and the other defending it’s honor, proclaiming that HFCS is perfectly safe.

 

The Truth

 

The line industry and the FDA has settled on is “HFCS is no more harmful to your health than sucrose (table sugar)”. 

 

1601546_10104604919720781_2037852626_nThe thing is, I agree with this. But that doesn’t mean HFCS is OK. It means the FDA and industry are missing the forest for the trees, and hoping you will too. To say HFCS is no more harmful to your health than table sugar is like saying gin is no more harmful to your health than bourbon. Would you really argue that drinking gin is fine but bourbon is not or vice versa? Of course not. You recognize that both in moderation can be enjoyed, but in excess BOTH will produce harm (in this example, in the form of liver cirrhosis and alcoholism). 

 

I will however, agree that HFCS can cause obesity, although not directly on it’s own. After all, HFCS isn’t even that “high” in fructose – only about 5% higher than sucrose. What happened was, HFCS made sugar SO CHEAP that the industry could put it in everything, even things that never had sugar before. They could manipulate sweetness to further addict you to foods, to produce larger serving sizes for basically nothing. HFCS doesn’t chemically cause obesity, but it set the stage for the environment that would.

 

My Advice

 

  • Don’t eat a lot of HFCS. Anything it’s in is usually cheaply made. Personally, I prefer the taste of barbecue sauce made with molasses and honey over HFCS, but if you treat your self to something that has it every now and then you will not give yourself cancer immediately. 
  • Don’t fool yourself – a cookie with HFCS is just as bad for your waistline and health as a cookie made with “organic evaporated cane juice” (which is just fancy speak for sucrose). 
  • Keep your intake of added sugar -a ALL sugars – to a minimum. Get your carbs from complex carbs and satisfy your sweet tooth with fruit.
  • Don’t avoid fruit – drinking straight fructose may be a bad idea, but eating fructose in the presence of fiber and other vitamins and minerals is the way nature intended. I mean, don’t eat 10 bananas in a day, but if you’re stressing about eating a second piece of fruit because you’re afraid it will harm your health and impact your weight loss, just stop it right now.

*There are some people for which avoiding fructose (and most other carbohydrates) at all or some parts of the day will be appropriate, including body builders on a cutting diet or women with Gestational Diabetes. 

25 Mar 2014

An Acquittal for Saturated Fat

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4931201391_6c72177b4f_zGrowing up I learned that fat was bad. Butter, beef, nuts, avocado – all “fattening” (seriously, we never had guacamole in my house growing up for this very reason). Lean meat lean beef lean lean lean has been drilled into us for the past thirty or so years. Even the American Heart Association – trusted resource for all things heart disease – recommends limiting saturated fat to just 5% of daily intake If you eat a 2,000 calorie diet, that leaves you with about 11 grams or  less than a tablespoon of coconut oil per day. (Although as a side note I somewhat question AHA’s wisdom after learning they endorsed Subway as a healthy meal option. But I digress.) Heck, I even learned it in college, and told I don’t know how many patients while I was working in the hospital to “choose lean meats and avoid foods high in saturated fat”. There has been questioning of this saturated fat-heart disease link recently, with a lot of it coming from the Paleo camp (Robb Wolf, etc).

 

Now, a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has cleared saturated fat of its charges. The review looked at 21 studies of over 347,000 people with follow up anywhere from 5-23 years. The results found no association between saturated fat intake and coronary heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular disease. Basically, there is no evidence to conclude that saturated fat is the devil incarnate.

 

What Does This Mean?

 

My general rule about saturated fat remains unchanged (and is essentially supported) by this study. Don’t be afraid of sat fat – there are a lot of food containing saturated fat that provide nutrients we need. Beef for example, is a good source of iron (which is needed to produce hemoglobin, a part of red cells that shuttles oxygen through the body. Not getting enough iron can result in anemia) and zinc (important for wound healing and immune health). But, most if not all of your saturated fat should still come from healthy, whole food sources – meat, milk, eggs, butter, etc and not from fried/processed foods or high sugar foods (like ice cream). Just as with carbohydrates, it’s not about the nutrient itself, it’s about where it comes from and the quality of that source.

 

The Bottom Line

 

Don’t be afraid of saturated fat. Just get it from the right place.

 

Source - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Image c/o Chris Lindsay

Hey Mickey!

Welcome to the TEAM Mickey!

Welcome to the TEAM Mickey!

I want to officially welcome longtime member Mickey Grouse to the TEAM! Mickey has been training with us for over 4 years, has competed in some local and regional events, volunteered his talents as a DJ for parties, etc. Now he will be apprenticing to be apart of our Coaching TEAM. 

Mickey is an all around good dude and cares a ton about the CrossFit Boston Community. He received his CrossFit L1 Certificate back in 2011. You will see him primarily shadowing me in both group classes and private sessions. He will soon be leading portions of the class and ultimately entire classes.

Give him a big fist bump and a FIRE IT UP!!

CrossFit Games 14.3

CrossFit Games Open 14.3 (AMRAP – Reps)
8-Minute AMRAP:
10 Deadlifts, 135# / 95#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
15 Deadlifts, 185# / 135#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
20 Deadlifts, 225# / 155#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
25 Deadlifts, 275# / 185#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
30 Deadlifts, 315# / 205#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″
35 Deadlifts, 365# / 225#
15 Box Jumps, 24″ / 20″

Deadlift and box jumps! Alright, we finally have a little weight now in the open. The ascending volume AND weight for the deadlift will make it challenging to maintain midline stabilization and not blow out the low back. Everyone will need to focus on bracing really tight while pushing the ground away through the heels rather than pulling the bar off the floor. Establish a pace that will be just below your threshold and allow you to keep moving steady. This is very similar to the pacing needs of Wednesday’s Row/Thruster WOD.

If 225 is heavy, be prepared to start breaking up into sets of 5 so that you can move faster. Try to avoid singles until you absolutely have to. If you are lucky enough to get into the heavier weights you need to game plan the number of reps/sets for completion. Think similarly to last week’s CTB pull ups, except you will have a much higher muscle economy.

Step ups or box jumps are permitted with the requirement of both feet on the floor at full standing and both feet on the box at full standing. The kicker is the height of the box. For the men, if you are shorter, a 24″ box may be too much to expect a good pace with step ups. Ladies you should be fine with 20″. We have been training the Games Standard for box jumps the last couple of weeks so you should know how to pace this already. 15 reps is manageable, just be sure to breathe and maintain control of your body.

Good Luck to everyone today!

What’s On Tap!

Keep your eyes open for another post today with next week’s programming!

12 Mar 2014

Paleo Pro’s and Cons

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Sorry for the late blog post! I’ve seen lots of new faces in the gym over the past few months, so I am reposting my go-to article on the good and bad aspects of the paleo diet, and some recommendations for using it to improve your diet for anyone who’s heard of the paleo diet during their intro sessions but still wants more information (or for anyone who wants a refresher). Also, I’m a little short on time as I’m in California for work (you feel so sorry for me, right?).

 

The Paleo diet -  also known as the “caveman diet” – is a way of eating inspired by the diet of our Paleolithic ancestors, the men and women who lived 2.5 million years ago, before the agricultural revolution began about 10,000 years ago and provided mankind with a steady supply of grains, corn, dairy, and domestic meat. The theory behind Paleo eating is that our bodies are genetically programmed to eat certain foods, and that many modern health problems like obesity result from the introduction of grains, dairy, and other processed foods, which wreak havoc on our metabolic systems. The diet, and it’s “allowed” and “restricted” foods, are based on anthropological research providing insight into what pre-agricultural humans ate.

 

Foods allowed on a strict Paleolithic diet include lean meats and seafood, eggs, fruits and non-starchy vegetables, nuts (except peanuts), seeds, and plant-based oils such as olive, coconut, avocado, walnut, or grapeseed. Restricted foods include processed meats (like salami), dairy, grains such as rice, pasta, wheat, and corn, starchy vegetables like potatoes, soy products, legumes like beans and peanuts, alcohol, and refined sugar.  Following a Paleo diet does not require minding of portion sizes or food measurement. The recommendation is to eat Paleo approved foods when you are hungry and stop when you are full. The idea is that it’s fairly hard to eat too many calories when they are coming from protein sources and high fiber, filling sides like vegetables, fruits, or healthy fats. The Paleo diet can be followed strictly or modified to meet your individual needs. For instance, some follow an “80/20” rule, eating Paleo about 80% of the time and allowing room for leniency with other foods or cheat days. Others follow a strict Paleo diet but include dairy, butter, or both.

 

 

The Research on the Paleo diet, while promising, is fairly limited. Several small studies have shown a Paleolithic diet may help improve markers of health in both healthy people and those with chronic disease. For example, one study showed that a Paleolithic diet resulted in lower mean glycated hemoglobin (a measure of blood sugar control over time) values, diastolic blood pressure, and waist circumference, and higher HDL cholesterol (the “good” cholesterol) when compared to a standard diabetes diet. Among healthy adults, a small metabolically controlled study (meaning what participants ate was strictly controlled) found improvements in blood pressure, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and cholesterol without weight loss over a 10-day period.

 

In addition, while the evidence for the Paleo diet specifically, especially in athletes, is not prolific, research has shown high-protein, low-carbohydrate type diets to be effective for fat loss in a number of studies. Recently, a study appearing in Nutrition & Metabolismfound that Paleo dieters not only felt more satisfied in terms of appetite, but also had lower levels of circulating leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite, food consumption, and body fat storage.

 

Why Eating Paleo is Awesome…

 

  • It eliminates the crap – eating whole foods and avoiding food products with refined sugars, preservatives, harmful additives, high levels of sodium, and added fats has numerous benefits in terms of weight management, health, and athletic performance.
  • More vitamins and minerals – because you eat more fruits and veggies on a Paleo diet, you are getting much more fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants than on a typical Western Diet. Vitamins can help, but 90% of the nutrients in a typical multivitamin tablet are not absorbed but are excreted (meaning you pee them out). Studies have shown that eating more fruits and vegetables reduces cancer risk, but when researchers attempted to isolate and supplement specific vitamins common in produce, the effect wasn’t replicated.
  • Less “bad” fat and more “good” fat – the Paleo diet typically consists of more omega-3 and unsaturated fats via increased intake of foods like almonds, walnuts, and avocados and reduction in saturated fats by eliminating high fat meats and processed foods like chips and desserts. Unsaturated fats may reduce inflammation, which is good for everyone, especially athletes.
  • Health Benefits – although the research is limited, the Paleo diet has been associated with greater weight loss success, greater satiety, and improvements in markers of chronic disease. There are numerous anecdotes of people having found success eating this way.

 

Why it’s not so awesome...

 

  • It takes more planning – it’s easy to get enough carbohydrates and calcium on a standard American diet. It’s also easy to grab lunch at the office if you forgot to pack it. So while it’s possible to meet all your nutritional needs on a Paleo diet while enjoying good food, it requires more planning and, often times, ahead of time meal preparation. If you’re not used to packing your lunch or cooking nearly all of your meals, it will take an adjustment.
  • $$$ – I don’t subscribe to the belief that it is more expensive to eat a healthy diet, but following a strict Paleo diet will up your grocery bill, at least a little bit, due to increased purchasing of meat and vegetables. This increase will be greater if you switch completely to organic and grass-fed products. On the flip side, if you give up junk food and soda and eat out less, this will probably even out.
  • Does it make sense? – Dr. Cordain argues that our bodies are genetically adapted to a Paleo diet, and the influence of grains and processed foods has led to our current health problems. But people started eating bread 10,000 years ago, and the epidemic of obesity and chronic disease is at best a 30 year old problem. So is bread and dairy the devil? Or is an increasingly sedentary lifestyle combined with more people eating out more often and ever growing portion sizes the real culprit?
  • Carbohydrates – for most people the moderate carbohydrate levels in a Paleo diet are enough to support normal functioning and maintain glucose and glycogen stores. However, people with higher carbohydrate needs, like endurance athletes, or rowers doing multiple workouts per day, may have a hard time meeting them on a Paleo diet.The Paleo Diet for Athletes, written by Dr. Cordain and endurance coach Joe Friel, actually recommends following a Paleo diet for most of the time while supplementing other foods, such as sports drinks, around workouts to get adequate carbohydrates.
  • Difficulty – A US News Report rated the Paleo diet one of the worst diets for 2011 and difficulty was a factor. For some people, eliminating 3 major food categories (grains, dairy, legumes) may just be too much to stick with over an extended period. Going on a drastic diet that you won’t be able to maintain could result in frustration, stress, and ultimately giving up and just “eating whatever” for a while, which will be a weight loss and/or goal setback and just leads to more stress.

 

So what should you do?

 

As far as I’m concerned, there is no “perfect diet” for all people. That being said, I think there is merit to the principles behind the Paleo diet and at the very least I would consider it a good framework for building a healthy, maintainable diet. Ideally, you do want to eliminate processed foods (like Spam, Cheetos, fast food, etc) and focus on more “Paleo foods” like meat, vegetables, fruit, nuts, seeds, and oils. However having the occasional whole grain (that’s wheat bread, brown rice, whole wheat pasta, oatmeal etc), dairy product, or legume isn’t going to kill you (unless you have a food allergy).

 

Here are some good guidelines to follow:

  • Load up on lean meats, veggies, and fruits first. They contain those essential nutrients like protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.
  • Eat a healthy diet that works for you and doesn’t drive you nuts. You want to follow a healthful nutrition plan, but you don’t want to set yourself up for failure either.
  • Avoid processed crap. It’s that simple. If the ingredients list is longer than your entire grocery list and you find yourself trying to decide if it’s healthy, just put it back on the shelf. It’s probably not that great for you.
  • Avoid added sugars and sodium. That includes canned stuff, “pre-made” meals, sugary beverages, junk snacks, and many breakfast cereals.
  • Limit the booze. It’s empty calories and makes you feel not awesome the next day, which can increase cravings for less healthy foods and limit your desire and/or ability to work out.
  • Disregard all of the above and have a cheat day every now and then. It can be good for you. Check out why here.

FIRE IT UP!

The last week has been awesome! Friday kicked it off with 2014 Reebok CrossFit Games Open 14.1. CFB has more than 50 athletes participating in the Open. The energy was awesome. Carla B leads all CFB members with a score of 362 and currently sits 24th in the NorthEast Region. The top 45 females in the region will qualify to Regionals at Reebok’s Headquarters in Canton, MA. Dave Young is leading the men with a score of 347 and sits 384th in the NorthEast Region. Hats off to them both for their efforts!

Kari T attacking 14.1 on Sunday. She improved her score by more than 10 reps.

Kari T attacking 14.1 on Sunday. She improved her score by more than 10 reps.

THE OPEN

In case you missed the previous communications, we will be running the Open WOD in class each Friday. If you cannot make it into the gym on Friday, then you may come in on Saturday or Sunday but you will need to have someone accompanying you to judge your performance. There will be a group that will retest on Monday as well. Again, you will need to schedule someone to judge you in advance to ensure that there will be someone available for you.

RING THE BELL BABY!

On Wednesday morning all 7 participants in the 7am class banged out Personal Bests! The bell was working on overtime and it was fun to witness. Audrey, JPerlo, Linh, Vijay, Patrick M, Matt, and Kapil all were machines in the back squat. I like programming the straight sets at higher intensity (5×2 – work up to a challenging 2 and hold it for all sets) for the barbell lifts. It removes any ceilings and encourages you to train based off how you are feeling instead of a fixed percentage. It’s not always going to be a PR day but when it is…RING THE BELL BABY!

audrey back squat vijayback

WHAT’S ON TAP

Friday 3/7

2014 Reebok CF Games 14.2
TBD

Saturday 3/8

1. AMRAP 5
15 Back Squats, 135/95
10 Pull ups

rest 5 minutes

2. AMRAP 5
30 Ball Slams
10 Burpees

3. Midline Work – 100 reps between Toe 2 Bar, GHD sit ups, Back Extensions (NOT HIP)

Notes:
1. Bar must be cleaned from the ground and then placed over head onto the shoulders for the back squat.

2. Weight of the Ball slams doesn’t really matter

3. Alternate T2B/Back ext/GHD sit ups

Sunday 3/9

“Filthy Fifty”

50 Box jump, 24 inch box
50 Jumping pull-ups
50 Kettlebell swings, 1 pood
Walking Lunge, 50 steps
50 Knees to elbows
50 Push press, 45 pounds
50 Back extensions
50 Wall ball shots, 20 pound ball
50 Burpees
50 Double unders

notes:
Scale as needed to:

40 reps
30 reps
25 reps

Monday 3/10

1. 21-15-9
Pullups
Deadlift, 225/155

2a. Pistols – Accumulate as many quality reps in 10 minutes
2b. Ring Dips – 4×3 AHAP

Note:
2a/2b – perform 5-10 reps of pistols then immediately perform 1 set of Ring dips

Tuesday 3/11

1. AMRAP 10
3 Push Press, 135/95
6 Toe 2 Bar
9 OH swings, 32kg/24kg

2. L-Sit holds – 6 x max hold

Note:
rest as needed between l-sit holds

Wednesday 3/12

1. Shoulder Press – 7×2

2. EMOM 10
8 Chest to Bar Pull ups

notes:
1. work up to a challenging weight and then hold for 6 more sets

2. Scale by reducing volume first before reverting to chin over the bar. If athlete cannot perform CTB they perform chin over the bar

Thursday 3/13

1. 30 Unbroken Wallball shots

2. AMRAP 4
10 Burpees
10 DB squat cleans, 40/20

If 60 reps (3 rounds) are completed in under 4 minutes, time extends to 8 minutes.
If 120 reps (6 rounds) are completed in under 8 minutes, time extends to 12 minutes.
If 180 reps (9 rounds) are completed in under 12 minutes, time extends to 16 minutes.

Friday 3/14

Reebok CrossFit Games Open 14.2
TBD

 


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Athlete of the Month

  • David Kemp

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    Let’s start with a regret. I wish I had gotten off my ass and joined CrossFit Boston a year ago. Fitness-wise, it had been a rough year since I got out of the Marines and started at HBS (Harvard Business School). Not that I wasn’t working out at all, but what I was doing wasn’t [...]

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  • ASHLEY SCAFETTA

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